Football-based inclusion project for migrants, refugees and asylum seekers in Seville

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Sevilla, Spain
Start date 02/15/2022
End date 02/15/2023
Cost of the project 121,692€
Foundation funding 80,000€
Project identifier 20210532
Partners Fundación Grandes Valores
Categories Access to Sport - Conflict victims - Personal development

Context

Four of Spain’s ten poorest neighbourhoods are located in Seville, where 38.6% of children are at risk or living in poverty and social exclusion. A large number of migrants also live in these neighbourhoods and are subject to exclusion and segregation. Inequality and a lack of employment opportunities have a significant negative impact on families, child development and education.

The Spanish Commission for Refugees (CEAR), the Betis Foundation and the Fútbol Más Foundation have joined forces to develop a project that creates community spaces to promote the inclusion and well-being of children and young people.

Project content

Through a socio-sports programme, the project will promote the physical and mental health and inclusion of children at risk of social exclusion in two Seville neighbourhoods. Campaigns will raise awareness of the importance of health in the development and inclusion of migrants and refugees and how football can be a vehicle for achieving this.

Objectives

  • Include migrant children and their families in the community and strengthen their resilience through sports;
  • Improve physical and mental well-being through socio-sports activities;
  • Improve the sustainability of the community by training young people;
  • Reduce social inequalities and prejudices towards the migrant population though socio-sports activities in spaces that are intercultural, equal and safe;
  • Run awareness-raising campaigns on social media and in schools.

Project activities

  • Socio-sports sessions: 90-minute sessions aimed at developing the children’s socio-emotional skills and promoting their well-being, as well as addressing cross-cutting issues of local interest ;
  • Family and community football: Socio-sports sessions focused on families and members of the community with the aim of promoting positive parenting and meaningful community bonds ;
  • Socio-sports events: The two communities participating in the project meet to share their experiences and get to know each other in an atmosphere where coexistence and friendship come before competition ;
  • Training in sport for development: Training in the Fútbol Más and sport for development methodologies will be provided to professionals and leaders of both communities ;
  • Awareness-raising and advocacy activities:
    • Activities and conferences in educational centres in Seville
    • Visibility activities together with football clubs
    • Awareness campaigns on human rights, gender equality and interculturality:
      • #TheBallHasNoGender
      • #TheBallHasNoBorders
      • #DeportePorRefugio

Expected results

  • Improved physical and socio-emotional well-being in children and young people;
  • Existence of inclusive spaces where local and migrant populations interact;
  • Increased number of schools that include non-discrimination and socio-emotional well-being in their activities;
  • Greater sense of belonging in migrant and local children who have access to safe, equal and inclusive spaces;
  • Young people certified in sport for development.

Partner

Live together II

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Turkey and Syria
Start date 01/01/2022
End date 10/30/2022
Cost of the project 200,000€
Foundation funding 200,000€
Project identifier 20210900
Partners Bonyan Organization for Youth and Development
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Conflict victims - Gender Equality - Infrastructure and equipment - Personal development

Context

The Syrian refugee crisis remains the largest humanitarian and development crisis in the world. Across the five main Syrian-refugee hosting countries, over 10 million people need some form of humanitarian and resilience support, the highest number in nearly a decade. This includes 5.5 million Syrian refugees and 4.8 million impacted host community members.

The key underlying issues are large-scale protracted displacement, socio-economic conditions, COVID-19 and demographic pressures. Turkey currently hosts approximately 3.6 million refugees, the majority of whom live out-of-camp, integrated into host (Turkish) communities in cities and villages. Both communities therefore share the same environment and resources.

Project content

The Live Together II project is a continuation of the 2019 Live Together project. Work will be done in schools to disseminate and mainstream football3 culture among teachers, who in turn will pass it on to the children. Capacity-building courses will be held, playgrounds rehabilitated and brochures, guidebooks and sports supplies distributed.

Children with special needs will also be included in the sports activities. Girls’ and boys’ football teams will be set up to involve girls in sports activities, with the hope that this will lead to wider inclusion of girls within the community. The project volunteers will receive training on child protection principles, awareness of child protection issues, the promotion of children’s rights and health tips to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Objectives

The project’s overall goal is to use football as a tool for building peaceful coexistence, as well as to improve the sports infrastructure in schools in the border towns of Akçakale in Turkey and Tal Abyad in Syria.

Project activities

  • Playground rehabilitation: Playgrounds in five schools – in each country - will be rehabilitated so that children attending and living near the school can play sports, which will improve their life skills and promote peaceful coexistence.
  • Teacher capacity-building: The teacher training programme will last four days and focus on mainstreaming the football3 methodology as well as other social cohesion activities that can be integrated into classwork.
  • Capacity-building for youth mediators: Youth mediators will volunteer as coaches in the football3 leagues. They will prepare and facilitate the football3 sessions, mediate any conflicts arising between the teams and act as positive role models for the children.
  • Running football3 leagues: Football3 leagues will be set up: one in Turkey and one in Syria. All teams will include both Turkish and Syrian children. Children will play in a safe environment where they will have fun, learn life skills and build their resilience. The volunteer coaches will discuss well-being with the children to provide them with psychosocial support.

Expected results

  • Playgrounds will be rehabilitated in five schools in Turkey and Syria.
  • 100 teachers will be provided with training on football3 and sports for children.
  • 240 children will take part in football3 games in Turkey and Syria.
  • 80 young people will play an active role in their communities and receive training on football3 methodology, leadership and conflict resolution.

Partner

Goals for my Future V

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Austria, Vienna
Start date 01/01/2022
End date 12/31/2022
Cost of the project 416,000€
Foundation funding 10,000€
Project identifier 20210383
Partners Mentor Management-Entwicklung-Organisation GmbH & Co OG
Categories Access to Sport - Conflict victims - Employability

Context

The average percentage of young people aged 15–24 not in education, employment or training (NEET) in Vienna in 2006–16 was 10.9%, or 21,800 young people.

The Goals for my Future V project follows on from four previous projects and aims to support young NEETs using football to encourage social participation and integration.

The target group is young NEETs, aged between 14–21 (possibly up to 25) who:

  • have not or have not yet completed compulsory schooling;
  • need a daily structure;
  • are threatened with immediate exclusion;
  • grew up in homes with parents with unstable employment histories;
  • come from families with low cultural capital;
  • belong to ethnic minorities or do not have EU27 citizenship;
  • have had negative experiences in the school system (truancy, suspensions, etc.);
  • have behavioural problems.

Project content

The average percentage of young people aged 15–24 not in education, employment or training (NEET) in Vienna in 2006–16 was 10.9%, or 21,800 young people.

The Goals for my Future V project follows on from four previous projects and aims to support young NEETs using football to encourage social participation and integration.

The target group is young NEETs, aged between 14–21 (possibly up to 25) who:

  • have not or have not yet completed compulsory schooling;
  • need a daily structure;
  • are threatened with immediate exclusion;
  • grew up in homes with parents with unstable employment histories;
  • come from families with low cultural capital;
  • belong to ethnic minorities or do not have EU27 citizenship;
  • have had negative experiences in the school system (truancy, suspensions, etc.);
  • have behavioural problems.

Objectives

  • Preparing young people for reintegration into education or training by resolving language deficits, reducing school-specific deficits and promoting social skills and appropriate behaviour
  • Activating young people’s self-help potential
  • Providing educational and professional guidance
  • Creating a stable, sustainable network
  • Creating a connection with a football club
  • Bringing participants in contact with NEBA, the Austrian vocational assistance service, if nothing else – school, education or work – is possible

Project activities

  • Highly professional football training twice a week, in three-hour sessions.
  • Three hours a week of a variety of sports: swimming, basketball, volleyball, table tennis, climbing, bowling, mini-golf, frisbee and much more.
  • Joint tournaments, friendly games and training with friendly clubs.
  • Participation in the Kleinfeld-Liga football league.
  • Joint activities with the team: cinema trips, excursions, visits to companies, workshops, juggling training, etc.
  • Provision of training equipment and jerseys, boots and shin pads.
  • Supervision, remedial tuition and lesson support to help with compulsory schooling.
  • Psychological and social support.
  • Individual coaching and work assistance.
  • German language training.
  • Support for parents.

Expected results

It is expected that 90% of the young people participating in the programme (35 boys and 20 girls) will:

  • begin/continue a qualification or job, or transfer to an organisation under NEBA;
  • improve their social skills;
  • develop a realistic career plan and be able to match their abilities with a suitable qualification or job;
  • experience greater motivation;
  • enjoy sports and exercise more;
  • better understand interpersonal interactions.

Partner

Improving the Psychosocial Wellbeing of Conflict-Affected Displaced Children

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Cabo Delgado, Mozambique
Start date 02/01/2021
End date 11/30/2021
Cost of the project 45,884€
Foundation funding 43,884€
Project identifier 20201286
Partners Street Child
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Conflict victims - Personal development

Context

Northern Mozambique has suffered from conflict and insecurity since 2017. Deterioration in the security situation and an increase in attacks has coincided with several emergencies: cyclone Kenneth in 2019, severe flooding in early 2020 and the emergence of COVID-19 in March 2020. Currently, 335,000 people have been displaced by insecurity, with children making up 50%. During this time, children have suffered from a sustained loss of education and exposure to traumatic situations.

Project content

Sport will be used to address the psychosocial needs of children affected by conflict and emergencies, while helping displaced children integrate into their host communities. Street Child will help schools to understand the needs of pupils and facilitate support sessions for them as they return to school post displacement and COVID-19. Community sessions will also be delivered by trained facilitators to out-of-school children.

Objectives

  • Address the psychosocial needs of children who have been affected by conflict, displacement and emergency situations
  • Support retention of children in school through the provision of support services
  • Promote integration between displaced and host communities
  • Promote children’s rights and strengthen protection mechanisms in the wider community

Project activities

  • Delivery of psychosocial support sessions to in-school and out-of-school children, using recreational activities, including sport, to help them deal with trauma and build life skills
  • Providing training workshops for psychosocial support facilitators in the use of play-based activities as a tool for integration and development
  • Providing teacher and school council workshops on the delivery of psychosocial support in schools and creating inclusive environments
  • Holding community awareness-raising campaigns on children’s rights and protection services

Expected results

  • 6,000 children (3,000 girls and 3,000 boys) will receive psychosocial support and integration support through in-school and community-based activities
  • 90 school educational staff will receive training in psychosocial support to promote inclusive environments for all pupils
  • 12 local community facilitators will receive training on the delivery of play-based psychosocial support interventions
  • 6 communities will receive awareness-raising on children’s rights and child protection services

Partner

Fun, Friends, Football camps

Location and general information

Terminé
Location Peru, Ayacucho, Quinua
Start date 01/04/2021
End date 05/30/2021
Cost of the project 81,322€
Foundation funding 39,444€
Project identifier 20201609
Partners Mama Alice
Categories Access to Sport - Conflict victims - Gender Equality - Personal development

Context

Mama Alice works with refugee children from Venezuela and Peruvian children growing up in extreme poverty.

There is little support or understanding among the Peruvian population for Venezuelan refugee children. Most Venezuelan children in Peru live in extreme poverty, which causes them a great deal of stress, which is then exacerbated by the discrimination they experience.

At Mama Alice, a professional and highly experienced multidisciplinary team guides both Venezuelan and Peruvian children towards a positive self-image and better social skills. All children participating in Mama Alice activities come from homes experiencing poverty, often accompanied by domestic violence, alcoholism, sexual abuse, poor hygiene and malnutrition. These problems have a major impact on educational performance and general well-being. When a child is never told that they are wanted and loved, the effect is devastating. Not only do they have poor self-esteem, but they also lack confidence in a better future. For some this leads to serious emotional or behavioural problems.

Mama Alice trainers and teachers are trained to recognise problems and refer children to social workers, nurses or psychologists. They see that their approach has a positive impact: children become happier, more confident and have better social skills. They also achieve better school results, make friends more easily and increase their problem-solving skills.

Project content

Mama Alice organises football camps for children living in extreme poverty and who are often from families with high levels of domestic violence, whether physical, psychological or sexual. Each camp is for 30 participants, divided into 3 groups of 10 (due to COVID-19 restrictions).

During the football camp, the children will not only improve their football skills, but they will also learn many new personal skills that should lead to significant personal growth.

A participation certificate and a photo book are given to the children at the end of the camp to ensure that they have lasting and proud memories. They may also share them via social media and with their friends and family.

Objectives

Overall objectives:

  • Peruvian and Venezuelan children develop more understanding and friendship.
  • They learn about nature and sustainability.
  • They learn about Peru’s history and culture.
  • They learn more about healthy food.
  • They have fun.
  • They have an unforgettable experience.

Specific objectives:

  • 90% of all participants show improved football skills.
  • 80% have improved self-esteem.
  • 90% show improved social skills.

Project activities

  • Football training : All trainers are trained in the Total Soccer Method by Igor Hameleers, the founder of several football schools in the Netherlands. Children take part in daily training, games and relaxation, which are adjusted depending on their level and motivation.
  • Creative activities: The Mama Alice teachers all have over ten years of experience in offering creative activities, especially for target groups with a negative self-image and no strong social skills. Through creativity and art, children also learn to express their feelings.
  • Wari cultural visit: Wari is an archaeological site in Ayacucho. The excavations show how the Waris (a people before the Incas) lived. Yasser, an archaeologist, guide and history teacher, tells interesting stories at the children’s level.
  • Quinua cultural visit: The last struggle for independence in all of Latin America was fought on the pampas of Quinua. The children visit an independence monument and a small museum at the site.
  • Psychosocial workshop: Mama Alice has been working with Peruvian children since 2005 and has developed a method that works well specifically for this target group. Interactive and playful workshops using this method create a safe environment in which children can express their feelings, gain a more positive self-image, understand themselves and others better, work together better and become stronger.
  • Health workshop: Activities are aimed at better personal hygiene, in order to prevent a number of diseases that are common in Ayacucho. Since 2020, prevention of COVID-19 has been added.
  • Musical games: Music therapist Frederique organises games to connect and relax the children and help those who cannot express their feelings easily.
  • Football match: At the end of each day a small 5 v 5 football match is played within the subgroups of 10 on small football pitches. On the last day, Saturday, there are three big matches between the different subgroups.
  • Presentation of the participation certificate: Every child receives a participation certificate and a printed photo book containing 20 photos of the camp, giving them wonderful memories of perhaps the best week of their lives so far.

Expected results

90% of all participants show improved football skills:

  • 90% know most rules.
  • 90% have a understandings of the game during a match.
  • 80% are able to receive a ball, pass it on and shoot at the goal.

80% have improved self-esteem:

  • 90% have more confidence in themselves, others and the future.
  • 90% are able to ask for help when they need it.
  • 90% are able to participate in all the different activities.
  • 80% are able to form their own opinions.

90% of participants show improved social skills:

  • 80% are more able to express their feelings.
  • 90% have learned to push their own boundaries.
  • 90% have learned to work and play together and to make friends.
  • 90% have increased their understanding of other cultures and backgrounds.
  • 90% have better personal hygiene.

Partner

Sports for Resilience and Empowerment Project (SREP)

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Uganda , Kampala
Start date 03/01/2021
End date 03/01/2022
Cost of the project 193,215€
Foundation funding 144,911€
Project identifier 20200410
Partners Aliguma Foundation
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Conflict victims - Gender Equality - Infrastructure and equipment - Personal development

Context

Children make up 60% of the Ugandan population, and 55% of them are experiencing child poverty. Of the 270 million people in Africa living in slums, 2.4 million are in Uganda and 60% of them reside in Kampala. Acholi Quarters is one of the biggest slums in Kampala and is home to over 20,000 people. Children living in slums face deprivation, exclusion, vulnerability and lifelong difficulties linked to limited physical, psychological and intellectual development. They are exposed to violence, exploitation, abuse, neglect, child labour, trafficking, sexual exploitation and child marriage.

Project content

The Sports for Resilience and Empowerment Project (SREP) aims to transform the vulnerable Acholi Quarters community through sports and was a result of consultations between the Aliguma Foundation, the children’s families and caregivers and community leaders. The project targets girls, boys, women and other caregivers (including refugees and those with disabilities) living in Acholi Quarters. A sports facility equipped with basic training facilities will enable 850 women and other caregivers to gain skills to start and manage their own businesses, allowing them to take care of themselves and their families sustainably. The goal is to protect over 2,500 children from exploitation and enable them to go to school and delay marriage until the right time.

Objectives

  • Develop a sports training facility to develop the talent of children in Acholi Quarters slums.
  • Use sport and trade skills to empower 2,500 children and 850 caregivers to escape social and economic exclusion by 2021.
  • Improve the capacity of 200 trainers and coaches to manage and improve the talent and social behaviour of the children.
  • Create access to social and economic opportunities for women and their children.
  • Raise awareness about child protection and gender equality.

Project activities

  • Training and mentoring community-based volunteers, informal community trainers and coaches, linking them to schools and churches in the community and establishing a ‘children- to-coaches’ support network.
  • Community sports activities and events involving all demographics of the community for social, health and wellness as well as talent development purposes.
  • Installing and erecting goal posts and nets, fencing the sports facility, building toilets and changing rooms, and procuring balls and other training equipment.
  • Training caregivers in practical skills such as shoe making, jewellery, tailoring, fashion and design, cookery, house-keeping, child care, nutrition, phone repair, computer literacy, finance, business plans and business development.
  • Drafting user manuals, best practice briefs and articles and conducting research studies and project evaluation.

Expected results

  • A sports facility in Acholi Quarters equipped with decent basic training facilities, toilets and changing rooms.
  • 200 trainers and coaches able to manage the holistic development of children.
  • At least 700 women and other caregivers possessing skills needed to start and manage their own businesses and take care of themselves and their families.
  • 2,500 children aged 6–17 (1,800 girls and 700 boys) protected from exploitation and able to go to school and delay marriage.
  • Gender equality in Acholi Quarters promoted and improved through equal opportunities.

Partner

We are the Champions

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location South-Sudan
Start date 01/01/2021
End date 12/31/2023
Cost of the project 180,166€
Foundation funding 103,200€
Project identifier 20200429
Partners Light for the World International
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Conflict victims

Context

Over 1.87 million South Sudanese people have been internally displaced by the conflicts that erupted in December 2013 and July 2016. In the aftermath of the December 2013 to April 2014 conflict, Light for the World carried out an informal random appraisal of the accessibility of the humanitarian services provided by various agencies in the Mahad and Gumbo Internally Displaced People (IDP) camps and host communities. It primarily assessed the education and rehabilitation services for children and adults with disabilities; the general physical accessibility of the camps; and the knowledge, attitude and practices of the humanitarian assistance staff in relation to disabilities. It was found that the knowledge, competencies, vulnerability and needs of persons with disabilities, especially children, girls and women, were being ignored.

Project content

The project’s main goal is to use sports to promote the rights of children with disabilities to access basic health, rehabilitation, education and other services in schools, IDP camps and host community settings.

Sports will further uplift spirits, promote inter-ethnic togetherness, raise disability awareness, and enhance social-cultural and economic inclusion and participation leading to empowerment and independence for persons with disabilities.

Objectives

  • Use the power of inclusive sports as a transformational tool in IDP camps and schools to break down the barriers preventing persons with disabilities from accessing humanitarian response services and education.
  • Promote inclusion in mainstream sports activities in three IDP camps and 90 schools.
  • Create an environment that promotes acceptance of disability.

Project activities

Creation of five inclusive football and basketball teams:

  • Community mobilisation with the support of community-based rehabilitation workers and disability inclusion facilitators
  • Procurement of sports equipment for football, basketball and indoor games, including first aid kits and dignity kits for girls with disabilities
  • Recruitment and orientation of coaches who will provide weekly coaching

Tournaments:

  • Tournaments in Juba every quarter for teams from three IDP camps
  • Friendly matches every month

Teacher training:

  • Training workshop for teachers/coaches in disability inclusion, inclusive sports, inclusive education and children’s rights
  • Refresher training for teachers and coaches
  • Follow-up on the impact of the training

Raising awareness:

  • Awareness raising campaign on disability rights/inclusion and peaceful coexistence including camp management committees
  • Celebration of World Refugee Day and International Day of Persons with Disabilities and production of information, education and communication materials

Disability mainstreaming:

  • Disability mainstreaming training for humanitarian and development organisations
  • Follow-ups and on-the-job coaching for humanitarian staff trained in disability inclusion
  • Continuous engagement with ministries, NGOs, companies and other stakeholders

Expected results

  • 5,000 children with disabilities will have access to existing services, including sports
  • 864 children with disabilities (250 girls and 614 boys) will participate in tournaments
  • 32 children from the inclusive sports team will be supported to become professional players
  • Five inclusive sports for peace teams will be created and trained and they will take part in friendly matches, tournaments and awareness raising campaigns
  • 90 teachers from 90 schools will be trained in inclusive sports lessons in a three-day training course
  • More than 18,000 people will be more aware of disability inclusion
  • There will be mass awareness campaigns in all three IDP camps and 90 schools
  • 18 humanitarian agencies in the IDP camps will become disability inclusive, through a five-day capacity-building training course

Partner

Refugee-led Sport and Early Childhood Education Programmes Launch in Chad

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Chad
Start date 01/01/2021
End date 03/31/2022
Cost of the project 165,253€
Foundation funding 77,145€
Project identifier 20201117
Partners iACT
Categories Access to Sport - Conflict victims - Employability - Gender Equality - Personal development

Context

Eastern Chad hosts 360,000 refugees, with numbers increasing due to violence in Sudan. Highlighted in the 2020 SDG report, refugees and those fleeing armed conflict, particularly women and children, face even greater risk to their health, education, and livelihoods due to COVID-19.

iACT is a groundbreaking international action organisation with a mission to inspire a more mindful humanitarian system. It works to ensure conflict-affected children and young people are able to exercise their rights to education and healthy development. iACT’s refugee-led, gender equity-focused early childhood education and football programmes meet immediate needs and have the ability to expand during and beyond the global pandemic to support communities long-term.

iACT’s Little Ripples and its Refugees United Soccer Academy (Academy) are the only programmes in eastern Chad that address gaps in preschool education and sport, providing refugee children aged 3–13 with comprehensive social-educational opportunities that will have a life-long impact. Little Ripples is an early childhood education programme that empowers refugees and communities affected by humanitarian crises to implement child-centred, quality, and comprehensive pre-primary education that supports the social-emotional, cognitive, and physical development of children aged 3–5. The Academy is a place for refugee girls and boys aged 6–13 to learn about teamwork, leadership, and peacebuilding, all while improving their football skills.

Project content

iACT’s Little Ripples and its Refugees United Soccer Academy (Academy) are the only programmes in eastern Chad that address gaps in preschool education and sport, providing refugee children aged 3–13 with comprehensive social-educational opportunities that will have a life-long impact. Little Ripples is an early childhood education programme that empowers refugees and communities affected by humanitarian crises to implement child-centred, quality, and comprehensive pre-primary education that supports the social-emotional, cognitive, and physical development of children aged 3–5. The Academy is a place for refugee girls and boys aged 6–13 to learn about teamwork, leadership, and peacebuilding, all while improving their football skills.

Objectives

  • Provide children with opportunities to heal from trauma and develop leadership skills through refugee-led early childhood education and sports programmes in all 12 refugee camps in eastern Chad.
  • Document the refugee-led process, particularly the expansion of programmes, and extract lessons learned to share with the humanitarian community, partners and supporters of refugee-led work, and sports and early childhood education leaders.

Project activities

  • Six days a week, children aged 3–13 will participate in Little Ripples and the Academy.
  • iACT’s refugee staff will lead the expansion of Little Ripples to one new camp (Amnabak) and the Academy to four new camps (Amnabak, Gaga, Oure Cassoni, and Treguine):A team of experienced staff members will travel to new programme
  • locations, engage the community leaders and members in dialogue, and train and hire coaches, teachers, cooks, and programme coordinators.Little Ripples teachers and Academy coaches will complete three training sessions over the course of 2021.
  • All new iACT teachers and coaches will participate in LEAD with EMPATHY, a leadership development and human rights curriculum that provides the tools and guidance for refugees to learn and practise community organising and programme management skills.
  • iACT staff will share insights and lessons learned from the entire refugee-led expansion process with UEFA and the humanitarian community.

Expected results

  • 80 coaches trained in iACT’s Academy curricula (50% male and 50% female).
  • 30 female teachers receive iACT’s Little Ripples teacher training.
  • 16 coaches hired (50% male and 50% female).
  • One camp coordinator hired.
  • Eight teachers hired.
  • 34 refugee staff trained in iACT’s LEAD with EMPATHY leadership development curriculum.
  • Three iACT refugee staff leading programme expansion in four camps.
  • 8,000 children enrolled in four new Academy programmes.
  • 180 children enrolled in four new Little Ripples preschool centres where they will receive nutritious daily meals.

Partner

Football Foundation Programme

Location and general information

Terminé
Location South Africa, Western Cap
Start date 01/01/2021
End date 12/31/2021
Cost of the project 81,000€
Foundation funding 30,000€
Project identifier 20201327
Partners Grootbos Foundation
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Conflict victims - Employability - Gender Equality - Infrastructure and equipment - Personal development

Context

The Football Foundation, a subsidiary of the Grootbos Foundation, operates in the rural towns of Hawston, Zwelihle, Hermanus, Stanford, Gansbaai, and Elim in the Overberg region two hours from Cape Town. Here vulnerable children and their families live in underserved townships and overcrowded informal settlements in inadequate shack housing without electricity, digital access, running water or inside toilets. Families move here hoping to find work, but are faced with socio-economic problems such as poverty, high levels of school drop-out, gangs, marine poaching, drugs, alcohol abuse and gender-based violence. With an unemployment rate of over 50%, exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, young people face a bleak future. Schools are struggling to serve these communities and children have little hope of breaking out of the cycle of poverty.

The Football Foundation programme aims to give these children role models, hope, healthy lifestyles and promising opportunities so that they can pursue the same dreams as more affluent children.

Project content

The Football Foundation programme uses community development sports programmes to give vulnerable children not just access to sport, but also to education, life skills, health and nutrition, life opportunities, gender equality, employability and conservation awareness, which paves the way to a better future and more dignified life.

8,461 vulnerable children attend free, daily, multisports coaching at community sites and schools. This gives them a safe place where they benefit from daily meals, role models in the form of their coaches, and digital access and learning support, which are vital during school closures due to the pandemic. The children receive education in female empowerment, conservation, nutrition, HIV and AIDS, employability, entrepreneurship and racial integration.

Objectives

The programme aims to uplift vulnerable children (aged 6 months to 18 years) through sports coaching, education and life skills to help them become thriving young adults. With a focus on the Sustainable Development Goals, in particular conservation, the programme is committed to conserving and restoring the natural biodiversity of the local Cape Floral Kingdom.

Project activities

  • Coaching in football, hockey, cross-country running, netball, track and field, canoeing, women’s rugby and water safety.
  • Motor skills sports at early childhood development centres and a special needs centre.
  • An HIV/AIDS programme in schools.
  • Afterschool programmes: female empowerment programme; Earth Rangers conservation programme; Food 4 Sport nutrition programme; and employability and entrepreneurship programme.
  • Learning support and free data.

Expected results

  • A minimum of 8,461 beneficiaries aged 6–18 years (49% female) of the sports programmes.
  • A minimum of 200 beneficiaries aged 0–6 years (50% female) of the motor skills programmes.
  • A minimum of 15 beneficiaries with special needs (aged 8–16 years) of the motor skills programmes.
  • 40 beneficiaries of the female empowerment programme.
  • 90 beneficiaries of the Earth Rangers programme.
  • 120 beneficiaries of the Food 4 Sport programme.
  • 120 beneficiaries of the employability and entrepreneurship programme.
  • A minimum of 8,461 beneficiaries of the daily meals scheme.
  • 100 beneficiaries of access to education support.

Partner

New challenges, new opportunities

Location and general information

Terminé
Location Hungary
Start date 01/01/2021
End date 12/31/2021
Cost of the project 62,920€
Foundation funding 50,000€
Project identifier 20200820
Partners Oltalom Sport Association
Categories Access to Sport - Conflict victims - Employability - Personal development

Context

In 2020, the world changed in many ways due to COVID-19. Although the virus affects everyone, the most vulnerable groups have suffered the most. Social distancing and isolation have exacerbated existing problems and the social gap between different groups in society has widened. In areas where children have not been able to thrive through digital education, their opportunities have dwindled.

Oltalom Sport Association (OSA) helps vulnerable children in Hungary at risk of exclusion. Some children have had to act as parents to their siblings, meaning that they have lacked the time and energy to focus on their studies. Their physiological, mental and academic development is severely affected, restricting their opportunities in further education and the job market. The children from refugee and migrant backgrounds lack social contact with the host society and feel isolated, and sometimes lack primary carers. In extreme cases, children have been exposed to distressing events at an early age, resulting in acute and posttraumatic stress disorders.

Project content

As a reaction to the deepening social and educational gap, the OSA aims to help children who have lacked parenting and education develop the skills they are missing to lead successful lives. The OSA does not intend to take over the schools’ role in formal education, rather to contribute to the invisible curriculum that is oftentimes missing from the children’s lives.

Objectives

  • Enhance physical and mental well-being.
  • Reduce school dropout.
  • Foster social skills development.
  • Encourage entry and re-entry to primary education.
  • Encourage continuation to secondary education, vocational training or higher education.
  • Promote social inclusion of at-risk groups (e.g. Roma minority, unaccompanied migrants and refugees).

Project activities

  • Regular football training.
  • Active social work.
  • Fair Play Football Roadshows.
  • Youth leader and football3 mediator training.
  • Participation in international tournaments.
  • English and Hungarian language clubs.
  • Female workshops.
  • Employability services.
  • Appreciative inquiry workshop.
  • Scholarship programmes for young leaders and street soccer coaches.
  • Study visit to Slum Soccer India.

Expected results

  • 450 regular football training sessions.
  • Ten female workshops and ten employability workshops.
  • Three football3 mediator training sessions and four young leader training sessions.
  • 150 English classes and 50 Hungarian classes.
  • Scholarship programme for three young leaders.
  • Summer camp.
  • Study visit for three OSA coaches.
  • Scholarship for two coaches from the Slum Soccer India organisation.
  • 500 direct beneficiaries and 660 indirect beneficiaries.

Partner

Football without Borders

Location and general information

Terminé
Location Austria, Vienna
Start date 12/01/2021
End date 12/31/2021
Cost of the project 203,050€
Foundation funding 40,550€
Project identifier 20200145
Partners Kicken ohne Grenzen
Categories Conflict victims - Employability - Gender Equality

Context

Around 11% of Austria’s 15 to 24-year-olds are not in training or employment. Most have a migrant or refugee background. According to the OECD, almost half of all unemployed young people are ‘inactive’, which means they are not seeking work or being reached via conventional integration measures. Alternative forms of learning, like Kicken ohne Grenzen’s football-based education project, therefore, have a key role to play.

Project content

Kicken ohne Grenzen aims to achieve the long-term and equitable integration of young refugees into society. Over a two-year period, 240 young people (>50% female) improve their social, mental and emotional skills through weekly open football training sessions. Intensive supervision both on and off the pitch allows the project team to evaluate the participants’ skills and interest. This insight helps the project team to organise career taster days and training opportunities as part of the award-winning Job Goals programme.

Objectives

  • Improved social and interpersonal skills, such as concentration, decision-making, self-motivation, and frustration tolerance.
  • Greater self-confidence and stability.
  • Better self-awareness and ability to identity strengths and areas for development.
  • Ability to improve performance.
  • Seamless transition to realistic training or work goals.

Project activities

  • Open football training sessions.
  • Football-based soft-skill training sessions to help the young people apply the skills they have acquired on the football pitch – like motivation, self-reliance, decision-making and teamwork – to their everyday lives.
  • CV writing workshops with external partners.
  • Individual counselling off the pitch (Job Goals programme).
  • Yearly tournament promoting gender equality and fair play.

Expected results

  • 250 open football training sessions across Vienna.
  • 240 participants between 15 and 24 years old.
  • Female participation of at least 40%.
  • Yearly tournament, with at least 300 participants, in which young referees, tournament directors, players and coaches act as role models for active integration.
  • 60 beneficiaries of the Job Goals programme (with a target achievement rate of 96%).

Partner

Mbo Mpenza Challenge

Location and general information

Terminé
Location Belgium
Start date 10/01/2020
End date 06/30/2022
Cost of the project 163,770€
Foundation funding 100,000€
Project identifier 20200480
Partners Impala Performance ASBL
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Conflict victims - Gender Equality - Personal development

Context

Belgium does not currently have a satisfactory strategy to integrate vulnerable young people, particularly refugees, disabled children and institutionalised children. The Mbo Mpenza Challenge project has been working to rectify this for the past three years by using football to promote the sporting values of respect, solidarity and pushing yourself.

Project content

The Association of Francophone Football Clubs will hold selection trials in early 2021 for over 2,000 girls and boys aged 10 and 11 from all backgrounds at the football fields of Decathlon stores. The Mbo Mpenza Challenge project will educate the children about combating racism and provide high-quality coaching focused on integrating every child. All children will be able to take part in these trials thanks to support from children’s institutions, vulnerable children’s coaches and carers of disabled or refugee children.

The 120 children selected will take part in a big one-day tournament involving small individual challenges and a final.

 

 

 

 

Objectives

The Mbo Mpenza Challenge seeks to educate children at an early age about discrimination and use football to instil the fundamental values of respect, team spirit, fair play and pushing yourself. The challenges are designed to foster team spirit by removing difference-related barriers.

Project activities

  • Training sessions for over 2,000 girls and boys aged 10 and 11 from all backgrounds
  • Small challenges at Decathlon football fields
  • Trials for a one-day tournament
  • Tournament activities: orientation for the children, training by qualified coaches, formation of twelve teams of ten children who have never met before, football challenges, a final in which the winning team will be selected based on criteria including fair play and pushing beyond limits

Expected results

  • Positive experiences will boost the confidence and self-esteem of the children
  • Excellent support will encourage the children to practise sport
  • Difference-related barriers will be removed allowing children from all backgrounds to mix
  • 2,000 children will directly benefit from the project and over 5,000 will benefit indirectly through 500 amateur clubs
  • At least 10% of the beneficiaries will be girls
  • A large number of disadvantaged children will benefit from the project and the club registration fees of the most disadvantaged will be paid for

Partner

RISE – Beyond Goals 2

Location and general information

Terminé
Location Greece, Athens, Thessaloníki
Start date 03/01/2021
End date 08/31/2022
Cost of the project 121,050€
Foundation funding 99,260€
Project identifier 20200333
Partners ActionAid Hellas
Categories Access to Sport - Conflict victims - Gender Equality - Personal development

Context

Two out of five children in Greece live in low-income households at risk of poverty and social exclusion. The situation is exacerbated by the migration crisis, with 50,000 refugee and migrant children in Greece. These children face numerous challenges, including domestic violence, high levels of school dropout and high levels of stress and depression. They also lack basic resources, educational support, and creative and life-skills education, resulting in fewer opportunities and social exclusion.   

Project content

Beyond Goals 2 is the second phase of ActionAid Hellas RISE programme aimed at deepening and scaling up its impact. The programme is led by international football player Dimitris Papadopoulos, who was inspired to create a football-based programme that would provide marginalised children with life values and skills affording them a better life with dignity and greater opportunities to develop themselves and their communities.  

Objectives

RISE's mission is to empower disadvantaged children by providing them with skills and access to opportunities in order to build their resilience and thus the resilience of their communities. This second phase aims to deepen and mainstream RISE’s impact by 

  • developing football and youth club activities in Athens to address youth disengagement, social exclusion and community-building issues; 
  • providing targeted dissemination/capacity building to sports, education and CSO professionals across Greece. 

Project activities

  • Foodball3 training and matches: Access to sports and motivation through positive role models (professional athletes and peers) for marginalised youth
  • National football3 tournament
  • Psychosocial and educational support services
  • Youth civic engagement activities (local youth action groups, capacity building and youth-led civic initiatives)
  • Community-building activities bringing onboard families
  • RISE model transfer workshops (physical and digital)

Expected results

  • 50 disadvantaged children aged 1217 will participate in football activities, receive support and be actively engaged in youth club activities in the long term 
  • 15 children aged 1417 will build leadership skills and act as youth mediators for their peers 
  • Five youth-led local initiatives 
  • Ten schools and 200 representatives from sports clubs, CSOs and schools across Greece will receive informationtraining and support in implementing the RISE model 
  • At least 1,250 children will benefit indirectly from transfer of the RISE model 

Partner

Open Fun Football Schools in Syria

Location and general information

Terminé
Location Syria
Start date 01/01/2021
End date 06/30/2021
Cost of the project 200,000€
Foundation funding 200,000€
Project identifier 20200868
Partners Cross Culture (CCPA)
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Conflict victims - Gender Equality - Personal development

Context

Syria is still one of the worst humanitarian crises in human history, with 6.1 million internally displaced people, including 2.5 million children.

Many families have started to return to their homes and are trying to get back to a ‘normal’ life. However, organised sports activities are still rarely accessible to children.

Project content

The Open Fun Football School initiative has proved to be an excellent tool to mobilise local communities and volunteer coaches in some of the most politically uncertain and conflict-sensitive areas across the world.

CCPA will use the Open Fun Football School (OFFS) initiative as a tool to enhance peace education, safeguarding and resilience among children and teenagers throughout Syria.

Objectives

The overall objective of Open Fun Football Schools in Syria is to enhance resilience and encourage a culture of peace and non-violence, gender equality, child protection, an appreciation of cultural and social diversity and of culture’s overall contribution to sustainable development.

    1. Mobilise a network of young Syrian leaders and coaches and build their capacity to independently organise Open Fun Football Schools and other community-based fun football activities
    2. Organising Open Fun Football Schools and other fun football activities for children aged 6-12
    3. Anchoring the network in sustainable and community-based clubs that organise day-to-day Open Fun Football School activities throughout Syria

Project activities

Open Fun Football Schools will focus on following areas : Damascus, Aleppo, Homs, Hamah, Latakia, Tartus

  1. Introduction to the CCPA child-centred and community-based approach for eight Open Fun Football School leaders/trainers-of-trainers who will receive training in theory and practice.
  2. 60 hours of Open Fun Football School coaching seminars for 96 coaches to teach them the approach. The seminars will be led by the eight leaders/trainers-of-trainers under the supervision of the CCPA and its associated partners from CCPA Lebanon, CCPA Jordan and CCPA Iraq.
  3. 30 hours of seminars run by the eight leaders for 96 young coaching assistants aged 14–18 to teach them the approach.
  4. Eight six-day Open Fun Football Schools organised by the leaders in cooperation with the trained coaches and coaching assistants for 1,600 children aged 6–12.
  5. One-day fun football festivals organised by the leaders in cooperation with the trained coaches and coaching assistants for a total of 1,600 children (show-ups) aged 6–12.
  6. Three-day seminar for 60 Open Fun Football School leaders and coaches so they can set up football clubs.
  7. Regular fun football training sessions organised by the Open Fun Football School leaders in cooperation with the trained coaches and coaching assistants for a total of 1,000 children.

Expected results

8 Open Fun Football School leaders /trainers-of-trainers

96 Open Fun Football School coaches

96 coaching assistants aged 14–18

  • gender balance: minimum 30% females
  • social balance: minimum 50% refugees/internally displaced persons/socially disadvantaged individuals

3 capacity-building seminars

3,200 children aged 6-12 years in 8 Open Fun Football Schools and Festivals

1 club-formation seminar

60 clubs set up

Partner

Youth in Action

Location and general information

Terminé
Location Northern Ireland and Republic of Ireland
Start date 12/12/2020
End date 12/01/2021
Cost of the project 100,000€
Foundation funding 50,000€
Project identifier 20200593
Partners Rio Ferdinand Foundation
Categories Access to Sport - Conflict victims - Employability - Personal development

Context

Black, Asian and minority communities across the island of Ireland (both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland) face racism, prejudice and inequality. Young people from minority communities are more likely to live in poverty than their peers, often in insecure housing (including reception centres), and face added language barriers. Families and communities are housed across borders (Britain, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland), and face increasing racism – in Northern Ireland alone, 40% of reported hate crime was race related.

Project content

The project’s mission is to tackle racism in Ireland and promote community cohesion and the integration of ethnic minority and migrant communities through sports and education.

 

Objectives

The programme aims to promote inclusion and friendship and tackle racism and prejudice on the island of Ireland, by working with young people, ethnic minority representative groups and refugees and asylum seekers housed in local communities. Young people will be given the opportunity to share experiences, cultural values and interests. Education programmes will use football and football culture as a pathway to explore the themes of race and racism.

Project activities

  • Delivering sports and educational activities that give people shared experiences and engage them in dialogue on solutions to racism, xenophobia and prejudice.
  • Delivering inclusive sports activities that create community cohesion.
  • Delivering education programmes that explore the themes of race, racism and prejudice
  • Training community role models and actors to deliver social action projects
  • Capacity building of ethnic minority and refugee groups to deliver services and engage with government agencies and civic society
  • Building a network of local community actors and organisations that will embed the approach in communities
  • Sharing best practices and building an ongoing support network across Ireland and the UK.

Expected results

  • Improved awareness of racism and racist behaviour.
  • Improved cohesion and integration of ethnic minority and refugee groups into communities.
  • Trained actors from across the community delivering social action projects and a shared methodology throughout the island of Ireland.
  • Greater skills in ethnic minority led organisations to deliver services and engage with civic society.
  • A support network across Ireland to advocate and lead on this agenda on a local and regional scale.

Partner

Football versus Discrimination

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Republic of Ireland
Start date 12/01/2020
End date 03/31/2023
Cost of the project 212,000€
Foundation funding 110,000€
Project identifier 20201607
Partners Sport Against Racism Ireland (SARI)
Categories Access to Sport - Conflict victims - Gender Equality - Personal development

Context

Recently, Ireland has been under international scrutiny for falling short of its human rights commitments to tackle racial discrimination. Sport Against Racism Ireland (SARI) programmes give children from diverse ethnic minority and indigenous Irish backgrounds the opportunity to take part in physical activity, meet people from different cultures and learn about human rights and racism.

Project content

SARI coaches – both male and female and from diverse ethnic backgrounds – will visit primary schools across Ireland to deliver anti-discrimination workshops to pupils. The workshops, lasting 60–75 minutes, gather children on the sports field or in the playground to play football, boost their health and fitness and develop ball skills, while considering and challenging all forms of discrimination, including racism, sexism and homophobia. The idea is for the children to take what they have learnt on the pitch, such as teamwork, respect, commitment and cooperation, and apply it off the pitch.

Objectives

  • Increase mutual understanding between children and young people from diverse ethnic backgrounds.
  • Help combat racism and xenophobia.
  • Promote the integration of immigrants into Irish schools and society.
  • Promote the involvement of immigrants in sport, volunteering and cultural activities.
  • Promote gender equality in sport and society.
  • Educate children about Human Rights.

Project activities

  • Role playing games for the children to understand and experience how it feels to be discriminated against.
  • Fair play football designed so that the players take responsibility for their own actions: there are no referees and the players are encouraged to resolve disagreements amongst themselves through dialogue.
  • An in-class questionnaire for the children about what they have learnt and their attitudes towards all forms of discrimination.

Expected results

SARI aims to deliver the workshop to over 10,000 children across the 26 counties of the Republic of Ireland.

Partner