Football for Inclusion – Everyone invited to the pitch!

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Moreno, Argentina
Start date 08/10/2018
End date -
Cost of the project €155,476
Foundation funding €104,400
Project identifier SAM – 01xx
Partners Asociación Civil Andar

Context

People with disabilities have fewer opportunities to take part in football and integrate into mainstream society because they face various social or cultural barriers and discriminatory attitudes. This violates their human rights. In addition, they find it difficult to access public facilities, education, healthcare, employment and cultural and sports activities.

More than 1 billion people around the world live with some type of disability; at least 2 million of them live in Buenos Aires, the focus of Andar’s social intervention work.

Project content

Through a combination of work experience, sport, art, cultural and health-related activities, Andar promotes the inclusion of people with disabilities. Its Inclusive Football League uses the power of football to promote and foster the active participation of people with disabilities in society, while also addressing stigmatisation and prejudice.

With the foundation’s support, Andar will build the local community’s first inclusive and accessible sports facility for children with and without disabilities to aid their integration. In an effort to bring the best out of every individual and foster equal participation, it takes account of the physical, communicational and methodological aspects of accessibility.

Objectives

Andar’s programme aims to:

  • promote social change through football;
  • generate job opportunities;
  • promote autonomy and develop skills and abilities, empowering the people and communities involved; and
  • reveal the potential of people with disabilities.

Project activities

A total of 3,633 people currently participate in Andar programmes:

  • Therapeutic space: 59 people with disabilities
  • Inclusive social businesses: 86 people with disabilities employed per month
  • Inclusive Football League (LFI): 2,488 participants per year
  • Liga Buenos Aires: 920 participants per year
  • National League: 1,296 participants at national level
  • Inclusive Football School: 172 participants all year round, and their families
  • LatAm Festival: 100 participants from 10 countries across the region
  • Training and educational visits: 1,000 participants per year

Expected results

  • Opportunities to develop the potential of people with disabilities
  • Creation of facilities in which diversity is accepted and valued as part of the human condition
  • Information, tools and new training approaches that promote human rights
  • Access to sport for social change

Partner

Field in a Box – Pirapora do Bom Jesus, Brazil

Situation géographique et informations générales

Context

Konami Holdings Corporation – a Japanese digital entertainment company and a UEFA Champions League sponsor – was willing to work with the UEFA Foundation for Children and take the Field in a Box concept to Brazil. The global not-for-profit network streetfootballworld helped Konami to identify a suitable location for its pitch – in Pirapora do Bom Jesus, on the outskirts of Sao Paulo – and chose local charity Fundação EPROCAD to maintain the pitch and ensure its sustainable use.

Project content

The UEFA Foundation for Children has been running its Field in a Box project since 2016 with the aim of providing enclosed, fully functional artificial football pitches to impoverished communities. These pitches are environmentally sustainable and quick to install.

Objectives

This project aims to improve the lives of young people and breathe new life into disadvantaged communities. By providing opportunities to play football, the foundation seeks to improve children’s health and support their personal development, while teaching them football’s core values (respect, team spirit, etc.).
Fundação EPROCAD is based in Santana de Parnaiba – a suburb of Sao Paulo – and uses sport, education and culture to help children, adolescents and their families to integrate into society. Its work is aimed primarily at children and young people from poor families, providing activities that contribute to social development. Through its projects, the charity gives participants access to sporting, educational and cultural activities that can help to improve their quality of life. It also offers targeted support in specific instances, as well as guidance and referrals for specialist care where necessary.
Pirapora do Bom Jesus is one of the poorest areas of the country, with 27.8% of the population living on incomes totalling less than half of the minimum wage. Heads of households have an average age of 44, with 17.4% under the age of 30. With no access to basic services such as health and education, life there is a struggle.

Results to date and expected outcomes 

  • This newly constructed pitch is the only place in the area where football can really be played.
  • Fundação EPROCAD will use the pitch to implement football-based programmes, as well as encouraging local people to make use of these new facilities.
  • Located next to a local day care centre, the pitch is ideal for physical education classes and recreational activities.
  • It is expected that about 2,000 children and young people from the local community will benefit from this initiative.

Partners



Logo street football world

 

Football Film Festival

Situation géographique et informations générales

Context

The Foundation of Polish Soccer is founded Polish Football Association. The foundation’s aim is to promote and develop football in Poland, to take action to develop and raise the level amateur football, and to support the activities of the Polish Football Association.

In 2017, Foundation of Polish Soccer initiated the first edition of Football Film Festival in Cracow in connection with UEFA EURO Under-21. This festival had the aim to promote football culture by seemingly football and film. This innovative concept was very successful and an innovative way to communicate with younger generations who had free access to the event.

The European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) showed clearly that kids from the poorest social group in Poland are in need of support to help them out of poverty giving them options and perspectives for personal development.

The Foundation of Polish Soccer wants to use the social and educational dimension of the Festival Film Festival by allocating a special free ticket pool for children and orphanages.

Project content

The football film festival was held in Warsaw from 25 to 26 May 2018.

The purpose is to promote sport and film culture especially among children and young people.

This year, the festival screened the most important documentaries of recent months, reflecting on the modern football world – its issues, absurdities and challenges, along with film portraits of football legends.

The festival had three sections:

  1. the main section included full-length documentaries produced after 1 January 2017
  2. the Krótka Piłka short-film section included both professional and amateur works
  3. the retro section looked back on important, yet forgotten films with a football theme, and we screened the best documentary along with feature films about football produced before 2016

The young participants had the opportunity to meet filmmakers, athletes and journalists.

On the sports side, a period was reserved exclusively for children to participate in practical activities on the playing field to promote physical and mental development.

Activities included:

  • film screenings dedicated exclusively to children – free entry;
  • zone of football activity at the cinema – trainings with trainers, football players from youth clubs
  • meetings with footballers and coaches,
  • distribution of football equipment
  • meetings with filmmakers, actors, publishers
  • exhibition of football posters

The novelty of the second edition of the Festival was to give the opportunity to youngsters to submit their own film to the festival organiser.

Objectives

  • With the support of the ministry of national education, the objective is to involve pupils from 459 primary schools, high schools and technical schools.
  • Support local communities and children from orphanages
  • Give access to football and culture to children in the poorest social groups and give them a new perspective of personal development and empowerment

 

Expected results

  • Attendance of 2,800 children aged 7-16 from schools and orphanages for free film screenings and football classes
  • Promote and develop football among children in need so that they practise sport for their physical and mental well-being, to gain self-confidence and new perspectives and believe in a better future
  • Promote and develop grassroots football in Poland

Partner

Football for Development after-school programme

Location and general information

Context

Cambodia has a population of just over 15.2 million, more than one-third of whom are below the age of 18 (UNICEF; 2012 data), and 17.7% live below the poverty line (World Bank; 2012 data). In the city of Battambang, where average earnings are less than $0.50 a day, the situation is even worse. This results in large numbers of children leaving school early in order to try to earn a living. The Cambodian school system does not provide for any kind of physical education, so many of those children living in poverty are also deprived of the benefits of sport.

Project content

The SALT Academy’s Football for Development project seeks to use football to effect social change – both in Battambang and beyond. The project’s organisers run workshops teaching sport and key life skills to pupils at state primary schools in the city and the surrounding area, seeking to turn those children into active citizens and leaders within their respective communities. The football3* methodology forms an integral part of this project, being used to promote values such as respect, integration and solidarity.

* Football3 methodology is used by the streetfootballworld network. It harnesses the educational potential of street football by ensuring that dialogue and fair play are integral to the game. Its overall objective is to promote life skills and empower young people to become leaders. The emphasis is on resolving conflict through dialogue.

Expected results

The project’s organisers will run educational programmes teaching key life skills, which will cover 12 different subjects, and a total of 60 activities will be organised in parallel. Football activities and the football3 methodology, which lie at the very heart of this project, will be used to promote its values. The training of coaches will allow the project’s objectives to be achieved in other schools in due course.

Partners

Inclusion of children with disabilities in Bolivia

Location and general information

Context

In the United Nations Development Programme’s most recent Human Development Report, Bolivia was ranked 118th out of 188 countries, making it one of the least developed countries in South America. With a population of 1.8 million, Cochabamba is one of the most populous of Bolivia’s nine departments. This project is being carried out in Sacaba, Cochabamba’s second city in Cochabamba Department, where 36,3% (statistics from Instituta Nacional de Estadistica)  censosbolivia)of the population live below the poverty line and many persons with disabilities are unable to gain an education or access required specialist health care services.

Project content

The discrimination that children and youth with disabilities face in Sacaba represents a significant barrier to their personal and social development. Light for the World International organises workshops and fun sporting activities for those children in a bid to end their isolation by promoting an inclusive approach to education and changing perceptions of disability in Bolivia.

Objectives

  • Strengthen relations between children and youth with disabilities (beneficiaries) and their families
  • Build up the self-confidence of the beneficiaries
  • Foster the social inclusion of the beneficiaries
  • Contribute to mainstreaming disability inclusion in local networks and regulations of the municipal government
  • Improve access to health services for children and youth with disabilities
  • Promote inclusive education for children with disabilities
  • Train youth with disabilities to access the labour market
  • Empower children and youth with disabilities, as well as their families to stand up for their rights

Expected results

  • Organisation of fun sporting activities for children and their families at regular intervals during the year
  • Organisation of sporting activities such as athletics, swimming, basketball, football, handball, slalom and dancing two or three times a week
  • Training of sports teachers at the Simón Rodríguez Teacher Training College to foster the social integration of participating children
  • Organisation of annual competitions and tournaments for people with disabilities to change the negative perception of disability in Bolivia in cooperation with EIFODEC (Escuela de Integración y Formación Deportiva, Expresión Artistica y Entrenamiento Laboral/ School for Integration, sports training, artistic expression and vocational training)
  • Organisation of 40 visits to schools to foster communication between children with and without disabilities

Partners

Brave Hearts

Location and general information

Context

Jojug Marjanli is a village of Jabrayil district, one of the seven surrounding districts of Nagorno-Karabakh region of Azerbaijan, located on the contact line with Armenian armed forces. Recently the village was liberated. After regaining de-facto jurisdiction over the village, the government of Azerbaijan immediately started rebuilding roads, schools and hospitals in order to create acceptable living conditions for everyone and to allow internally displaced people and refugees to return.

The Association of Football Federations of Azerbaijan (AFFA) is sensitive to charity causes and social responsibility projects are one of its main priorities. The association works closely with UNICEF on the promotion of healthy lifestyles, children’s rights and the eradication of violence against children, and also has a national disability football team.

Project content

As a universal game, football is an excellent way to provide internally displaced people and refugees with an enjoyable and unifying pastime.

The Brave Hearts project aims to improve the health and well-being of people living on or close to the border. Whether in a refugee or in a school camp, in the street or in the pitch, the project wants to give them the opportunity to play football anytime and anywhere.

Three-day football festival with monthly follow-up mini-tournaments in different refugee camps in Jojug Marjanli and nearby locations will involve the installation of mini-pitches, small-sided football games and other football activities, other games, face art, personal development workshops and training, a concert and the distribution of football kits and equipment. The festival will be open to the whole population and will brighten up the lives of adults and children, uniting and encouraging them to stay strong, continue achieving their goals and lead healthy livestyles in turbulent times. Afterwards, every three months, there will be a one-day long mini-tournament in Jojug Marjanli, until the end of the project.

«Brave Hearts» Football Festival

Partners

Field in a box – Cape Town

Location and general information

Context

Following the successful installation of Field in a Box football pitches in Madrid, Spain and Mragowo, north-eastern Poland, the UEFA Foundation for Children decided to continue its work with FedEx, which has financed the construction of a new pitch in Cape Town, South Africa. The global not-for-profit network streetfootballworld helped to identify the location for the pitch and to select local charity Oasis FC to maintain the pitch and ensure its sustainable use and positive impact.

Project content

The UEFA Foundation for Children has been running the Field in a Box project since 2016, the aim being to provide an enclosed, fully functional artificial football pitch to communities in need. The system is environmentally sustainable and quick to install.

Objectives

By promoting this project, the UEFA Foundation for Children aims to improve the lives of young people and breathe new life into disadvantaged communities. By providing opportunities to play football, the foundation endeavours to promote children’s health and support their personal development, while instilling in them the values of football, such as respect and team spirit.

Founded in 2000 as a football club providing opportunities for young people living on the streets to play, Oasis has evolved into an organisation that creates development opportunities for its local communities. The Oasis football club consists of six junior teams, a women’s team and two senior teams, and coaches must ensure players participate in life skills sessions as they progress through the various divisions. The primary focus is on using the ‘football for good’ and football3 methodologies to discourage young people from anti-social behaviour and to improve their life skills.

The construction of the new pitch will enable more ‘football for good’ activities to be organised, namely football club training, football3 matches after school in the local community, training sessions for other local NGOs, friendly games played at night and an annual football tournament to raise awareness of HIV.

Expected results

  • Organising football training using the football3 method
  • Developing concepts and studies to promote the continued use of football as a medium for social integration
  • Maintaining and ensuring sustainable use of the pitch by generating income through the formation of a corporate league
  • Organising an annual football tournament to raise awareness of HIV
  • Over the next year 7,800 participants are expected, 800 of whom will be taking part in the ‘football for good’ programmes organised on the Field in a Box pitch

Partners



Logo street football world

Football United Myanmar

Location and general information

Context

Kayin State is one of the most war-torn parts of Myanmar. Decades of conflict between government and ethnic Karen armed forces have deprived children and their families of essential services while compromising their security and well-being. Tens of thousands of parents have become migrant workers in Thailand, leaving their children behind and in greater danger of exploitation. This population lives with poor access to basic services, political and economic instability, high unemployment and low-income levels, leading to weak social networks and a relative lack of opportunity. Loss of trust, hope and confidence, post-traumatic stress disorder, and changes to social structures and livelihoods are the social challenges that currently need to be tackled.

Project content

Based on the evidence that engaging young people positively and giving them a stake in their societies during the transition from violent conflict is important for long-term peace and stability, the project for 2018–19 aims to maximise youth and community engagement. It also aims to strengthen existing local collaboration and partnership, maintain the project’s current momentum, transfer programme ownership to the local community and introduce social-enterprise approaches. The ultimate goal is to ensure the sustainability of the football-based social cohesion, grassroots peacebuilding and reconciliation project.

The Football United project is based on four key aspects:

  • Contact theory – If diverse groups engage equally, have a common goal and work together with the support of the authorities and without competition, relations will improve between the groups experiencing conflict, and prejudice towards other groups will be reduced.
  • Positive youth development approach – This refers to an intentional effort to provide opportunities for young people to enhance their interests, skills, and abilities, rather than trying to fix their problems weaknesses or shortcomings. The Football United project enables young people to test, explore and apply their development potential through football and related development work.
  • Conflict transformation framework and sport-for-peace ideology – Sport can help provide the framework for reconstruction and reconciliation after a conflict by promoting peaceful culture through sport’s social values, building community/youth networks, positive relationships between conflict-affected communities and strengthen their participation in grassroots sport.
  • Experiential learning methodology – Learning through reflection on doing. Football activities are specially prepared to be a source of reflection to learn more about peace, social cohesion and reconciliation.

Objectives

  • Weekly football-based grassroots peace-promotion activities and football-for-peace gala days
  • Open community football coaching courses for local volunteers in conflict-affected area
  • Inter-community football-for-peace gala days run by the community
  • Regional football-for-peace festivals run by Hpa-an university student volunteers
  • Advanced coaching courses for university student coaches to become coach trainers
  • Provide funds to set up a football-for-peace centre in the state capital, Hpa-an
  • Facilitate the social-enterprise mentoring process in collaboration with the British Council Myanmar and other partners in the community
  • Set up a football for development and peace forum in Hpa-an, targeting universities, youth organisations and CBOs working in youth development and peace-building to promote football, peace, work and the dissemination of the Football United model in other regions of Myanmar
  • Set up a football for peace centre with a playing field and multipurpose hall for community events, workshops and training

Expected results

Football United will mobilise the local community, the government and charity organisations to help set up the football for peace centre, which will be used not only for project activities but also for income-generating purposes and social-enterprise schemes.

Partners

Football4Good

Location and general information

Context

Approximately 330,000 migrant children currently live in Thailand, many in construction-site camps. As their parents have come to Thailand to work, these children live in precarious temporary shelters with limited access to education, health and safety services. They are exposed to various forms of abuse, violence and neglect. None of them have the opportunity to escape from the slums and socialise with others, so they are forced to stay and play in unsafe surroundings with little stimulation or interaction with others. Their vulnerable situation means that they are at risk of being deprived of their basic rights. Moreover, the limited opportunities for socialisation and play mean that these children have no opportunity to ‘just be kids’.

Project content

The Baan Dek Foundation believes that football is a necessary component of childhood development, a fertile ground for learning essential skills such as teamwork, self-esteem, confidence, good sportsmanship and discipline. Football4Good encourages positive peer relationships among children from different ethnic backgrounds through coaching, physical activity, the provision of quality sports equipment and training the foundation’s staff in sports development. It supplements the foundation’s other programmes aimed at improving childhood development.

Currently, the Baan Dek Foundation operates in construction-site community camps and other urban slums around the Chiang Mai area, helping around 1,000 children a year to access basic services, including non-formal education sessions and after-school study, and providing individual tailored support for families and children in need.
Adding the football dimension to its existing programmes will reinforce the necessary component of holistic childhood development. In addition to integrating football sessions in the community and during children’s school holidays, the foundation aims to inspire children to pursue sport and create awareness of the benefits of sport for development, by inviting local professional footballers to come and present their career at a local public school.

Football is a crucial multipurpose tool for social workers, and can positively influence children in need of support at a very fundamental level. The Football4Good programme will help to connect with marginalised communities through regular football sessions, as well as providing adequate sports equipment for targeted vulnerable communities. Children and teenagers will develop motor skills, improve their exercise habits, have the chance to socialise with their peers and build new social relationships within communities where violence is a daily occurrence between various ethnic groups. Furthermore, football teaches these children to become team players, to integrate into a diverse group and socialise and to practice good sportsmanship. All of these benefits, in addition to providing a fun activity for the children, makes football and sports education in general a primary focus for the foundation’s community programmes.

Objectives

The Football4Good programme delivers sports education through community football sessions and during school holidays, to:

  • Empower children and enhance their psychological well-being
  • Increase self-esteem and resilience
  • Contribute to the benefits of physical exercise for children
  • Allow children to engage with their communities and others through teamwork and sportsmanship
  • Provide a necessary supplement to the Baan Dek Foundation’s programmes focusing on access to basic services.

Expected results

  • Number of football sessions held throughout Smile Holidays (stimulating activities organised by the Baan Dek Foundation for children during their school holidays) and in communities: 70 in one year
  • Number of children attending Smile Holidays and community Football4Good sessions: 250 in one year
  • Total attendance expected in Smile Holidays and community football sessions: 3,500+
  • Number of girls attending Smile Holidays and in community football sessions: 75 girls 7–15 years old
  • Number of communities using Football4Good materials and facilities: 5

Partners

UVS International Education Centre

Location and general information

Context

Talibé is the name given to children living on the streets of Senegal. They are on the streets for various reasons: many are orphans, from poor families or marginalised because of a disability. Left to take care of themselves, their main objectives are often simply to find enough to eat and a roof to sleep under. In this desperate situation, the children of Saint-Louis find refuge in violence or drugs, using substances such as glue in plastic bags.

Life is also tough for children living at home with their family. With financial resources scarce, one out of every two children do not attend school but carry out household chores or painstaking work in the fields from a very young age.

Project content

In 2008, Sport dans la Ville, in cooperation with UNESCO, opened its first school in Mali, which enabled more than 160 children from disadvantaged families to benefit from school education, sports activities, medical care and vocational training. Sport dans la Ville would like to open a similar school in Saint-Louis, where the French organisation has been running various education and sports-based projects since 2002.

The UVS International education centre will have:

  • dormitories for boarders
  • a dining hall and kitchen for the children’s meals
  • three classrooms
  • an administrative building
  • a barn for animals and a fenced plot of land
  • a toilet block
  • an indoor sports court (basketball, volleyball, handball)
  • a football pitch

The sports activities available at the UVS International centre will also be used to promote prevention campaigns relating to local health issues (malaria, typhus, etc.) and to raise public awareness concerning various topics such as children’s rights.

Objectives

The centre has a two-fold objective. In cooperation with the Saint-Louis social services, it will accommodate and take full responsibility for the street children of Saint-Louis by offering them:

  • board and lodging
  • a full school curriculum
  • medical care
  • vocation training from age 16
  • daily sports activities
  • micro-credit when they leave the centre in order to start their own business
  • access to suitable regular sports activities for children from neighbouring villages that do not have any sports facilities or equipment of their own

 

Expected results

  • Initially, to take in and look after 100 Saint-Louis street children
  • To offer sports activities to 5,000 pupils of schools within a 20km radius of the UVS centre. A school bus service will enable the children concerned to enjoy a variety of suitable sports activities run by experienced sports coaches.

Partners


Protection, education and reintegration of street children in Bangui and Brazzaville

Location and general information

Context

According to the 2016 United Nations Development Programme’s Human Development Report, the Republic of the Congo is ranked 135th out of 188 countries, while the Central African Republic is bottom of the list (2016). The humanitarian crisis in the Central African Republic and the endemic poverty in the Republic of the Congo are affecting highly vulnerable young children, including those living on the streets of Bangui and Brazzaville. These children can end up sleeping rough for many reasons. Whether it is a result of a forced marriage, economic pressure or fear of a ‘child witch’, these children are demonised and left to look after themselves on a day-to-day basis.

Project Content

Triangle Génération Humanitaire is an international solidarity organisation that helps to fight poverty in the world. In Brazzaville and Bangui, it hopes to develop prevention tools aimed at protecting vulnerable children. To this end, mobile teams of social workers and nurses go out into the streets of the capital cities of the Republic of the Congo and the Central African Republic on a daily basis. By offering them a listening ear and psychosocial and medical assistance, the multidisciplinary teams guide the children towards suitable support structures. They also organise sports, games and other leisure activities using sports equipment made available to the children.

Objectives

  • To provide psychological, social and medical assistance to street children in Brazzaville and Bangui
  • To promote the social reintegration of vulnerable children:
    • by providing them with support and access to suitable services such as foster families or reception centres, which will all receive financial compensation
    • by offering them education provided by specialist local institutions
    • by offering them vocational training (in baking, weaving or repairing) provided by local instructors
  • To reunite broken families by providing support and mediation between children and their families
  • To help juvenile offenders in Brazzaville by offering them:
    • sports activities to help them learn values such as discipline, respect and hard work in order to prepare them for their release from prison
    • education sessions on high-risk activities such as prostitution, drug abuse and crime. These will be organised by the ‘Network of NGOs working with street children in the CAR’ (RFERC) and the ‘Network of NGOs working with children experiencing social disruption in the Republic of the Congo’ (REIPER)
  • To raise awareness of and educate politicians and the public sector concerning children’s issues
  • To help the project’s partners and child protection organisations, in particular by strengthening the organisational and operational capabilities of the RFERC and REIPER 

Expected results

  • 1,000 patrols carried out by mobile teams
  • Assistance given to 2,000 children
  • 23 places in foster families and 20 places in reception centres offered every month
  • 200 children placed in mainstream schools
  • 100 children reunited with their families
  • 550 visits to imprisoned minors
  • 60 education sessions for imprisoned young people
  • A three-day seminar on the protection of vulnerable children in Brazzaville

Partners

Socio-sports school for street children

  • Location and general information

    Context

    The legacy of decades of war in Afghanistan is a nationwide breakdown of social and economic structures. Poverty is the main determinant of child labour. Many families have no choice but to send their children out to work. Street work is the most common among children: they sell items such as cigarettes and newspapers all day long, exposed to harsh conditions and under threat of abuse.
    Action for Development has decided to tackle the issue of street children by launching an innovative project in the streets of Kabul that combines football with educational and nutritional services. The socio-sports school for street children will have a positive impact on marginalised youth wherever it is applied. Afghanistan’s context makes it a particularly good target for this project, not only because of the rapidly growing interest in football and the sport’s impact on the country generally, but also the positive effect it will have on girls in particular.

    Back-to-school activities
    Children over the age of six who have the potential to be reintegrated into the formal school system will be identified. This will be done in collaboration with local authorities, schools and parents.

    Awareness campaigns
    Meeting with families of children attending the school for awareness training. Mothers will be taught about topics such as children’s hygiene, disease and the dangers of drugs and prostitution. Special emphasis is placed on young girls’ issues as they are often the most vulnerable of street children.

    Local development
    Identifying children willing to take part i

n the project. As many as 120 children have already been enrolled but more children are to be given the opportunity to do so. Children need to be committed to attend the training sessions. Priority is given to orphans and children who have a disabled parent, and 50% of the participants must be girls.
Those children in need of medical assistance will be sent to the general health centre where they will be provided with free healthcare.
Sports activities will be run by coaches at fixed times during the week. Groups are formed according to age and where necessary by gender, and each group will have two sessions each week. The school’s tutoring activities will be held before or after the sports activities. All activities will be conducted in Dari and in Pashto, the main languages in Afghanistan. Attendance of the tutoring activities will be flexible to allow the children to keep working as this is still their only means of survival.

Objectives

  • The overall objective of this project is to provide the street children of Kabul’s district 11 with an opportunity to gain a basic education and learn to read and write.
  • Find a suitable location where the children typically work to avoid long commutes on foot.
  • Have suitable facilities for the socio-sports school that is easily accessible to children, close to the road, near the Ghazi high school (15-minute walk), and has a football pitch that could be used for playing football and training.
  • To develop social abilities through sport and football especially and help them integrate into normal school programmes.

Expected results

  • Train coaches to promote knowledge transfer and empower the local population
  • Provide 400 street children with extra nutrition and access to primary medical care
  • Reduce the number of illiterate street children
  • Work with 300 families to reintegrate some of the street children into the formal school system
  • Teach 300 families about the risks of street work, the importance of education, and hygiene and sanitation to reduce risks of disease

Partners

Creciendo con el Balón(Football for Growth)

Location and general information

Context

George Monbiot, British writer and political activist, once stated that “a community not built around children is no community at all. A place that functions socially is one in which they are drawn to play outdoors”.
Ciudadela Sucre is a community located in the hills to the south of Soacha in Bogota’s metropolitan area. Its population of more than 63,500 has seen major growth over the past few years, especially during the 1990s, with 48 families on average arriving every day, displaced by the violence and lack of opportunities in other regions of Colombia. As a result of this rapid expansion, the local population suffers from limited access to education, a lack of public services and, ultimately, a shortage of safe spaces for local children and teenagers to play in. Without these spaces, they resort to playing in rubbish dumps or between cars in busy streets.

Project content

Football for Growth is a joint project launched by the Tiempo de Juego Foundation and Love.fútbol, two non-profit organisations that focus on fundamentally different, but complementary social missions in the sport for development sector.
Tiempo de Juego uses football to promote values and formal education in several cities in Colombia, providing a range of programmes and activities aimed at enhancing participants’ personal and professional development. Love.fútbol partners with communities to plan, create, manage and ultimately redefine safe and accessible football pitches wherever children have nowhere to play.

The programme will last 17 months and activities will be divided between two axes:

  • Free time activities: a wide range of sports and cultural activities for the positive use of free time will be coordinated by Tiempo de Juego on the new pitch, reinforcing the connection between local schools, children, teenagers and families. Tiempo de Juego expects to attract 600 participants aged 5–20 years old to these regular activities.
  • Leadership school: Using the Football3 methodology, Tiempo de Juego aims to foster a positive change in the community through capacity-building for 14 youth leaders and monitors. Training sessions will be held weekly and each month there will be a focus on a different life skill. Recreational exercises will be combined with field trips and workshops, ensuring that the youngsters understand from experience what each skill entails and the implications it can have in their lives. Ultimately, the leaders and monitors from the leadership school are responsible for coordinating the leisure activities among the wider community, strengthening their leadership skills while replicating the knowledge acquired in the school.

Objectives

Objective: Promote active and positive lifestyles among youngsters in the metropolitan area of Bogota by providing access to sport

Specific objective 1.Build the first open, safe and inclusive sport venue in Ciudadela Sucre
Specific objective 2. Promote the development of life skills among children and teenagers in Ciudadela Sucre by means of leisure activities

  • Venue: the project will involve different groups in the community – local government, parents, NGOs, teachers, sports, cultural and religious groups, local businesses and other youth advocates – to develop the first open, safe and inclusive sports venue in Ciudadela Sucre: a 75 x 45m synthetic turf football pitch.
  • Engagement: the partners will conduct an asset-mapping study to identify the leaders, talents and local know-how that exist in the community, then bring them together in a planning committee.
  • Construction: the partners will provide materials, technical and safety conditions, while local volunteers will be involved in building. On average, a community-driven project requires 2,000 hours of volunteer work.
  • Post-project phase: Love.fútbol will facilitate the transition from the planning committee to a far-reaching neighbours network that will maintain the facility.The ultimate goal for this space is that participants should be able to maintain both the physical facility and its ethos by means of a shared sense of ownership, responsibility and leadership.

Expected results

  • Construction of a 75 x 45m synthetic turf football pitch (from March to May 2018).
  • Inauguration day with a football festival (May 2018).
  • Creation of neighbours network for maintenance and planning activities.
  • Regular facilities for 600 participants aged between 5 and 20 years old.
  • Tiempo de Juego programming development of sports activities and training of 14 community leaders (June 2018 – May 2019).

Partners


Football for Respect!

Location and general information

Context

Hungary has been reluctant to keep its border open to the influx of refugees since 2015. This difficult situation is a major obstacle to the integration of these people and in particular refugee children.
This project targets:

  • underprivileged children and teenagers, e.g. those living in the slums of Budapest and the most deprived north-eastern region of Hungary together with their families
  • children and teenagers living in institutions
  • refugees and asylum-seeking children and teenagers

Project content

Regular football training: Regular exercise improves physical and mental health and overall well-being. Team sports help children enlarge their social network and gain a sense of belonging, which is very important to their mental health. The success they lack in other areas of life can be found in football, boosting their self-confidence.

Continuous social support: Social workers are present at each training session and football activity. Through this contact the participants can receive support services for housing, employment, education, healthcare, mental health and administrative issues. Close cooperation with teachers provides support for the children’s education.

Girls’ club: This club will provide special support for girl players. Experience shows that they face different challenges from boys and lack sufficient support on account of their underprivileged background. Experts will hold ten monthly sessions on specific issues, such as prevention of early pregnancy, drug prevention, knowing your rights, domestic violence, sexual abuse, and human trafficking.

Employability programme: Tailored support is provided, such as individual job coaching and weekly English classes to improve employability. International tournaments are great opportunities for players to practice their English in real-life situations and that increases their motivation to learn.

Young leader scholarship programme: Experience shows that special emphasis needs to be put on supporting young leaders who have been taking part in the football programme for a long time. Throughout the project, ten young leaders will be selected to take part in the scholarship programme. Their task will be to organise football activities, while they will also take part in the employability programme and receive a monthly allowance to cover their accommodation and living expenses, which will enable them to study without needing to work full-time. Young leaders play a key role in the sustainability of the project, as they will be able to hold training sessions and organise football events independently.

Fair Play Football roadshows: Special emphasis is placed on marginalised participants, especially refugees, playing football with other social groups. Peace-building and social inclusion of underprivileged groups are fostered by six Fair Play Football roadshow events, at which teams from different backgrounds play each other using football3 rules that teach players respect, improve their tolerance, help them articulate their interests, and negotiate with others. They learn how to manage their anger and their communication skills improve. Playing against others helps challenge stereotypes and reduces social exclusion.

Summer football camp: A summer football camp will be organised in a remote village called Hejce in north-eastern Hungary. A total of 40 children, 5 staff members and 5–8 volunteers will take part in the five-day camp that will give the underprivileged children a holiday. Besides various sporting activities, the camp is a great opportunity to make new friends, enhance their social inclusion and improve their Hungarian.

International tournaments: Taking part in an international tournament boosts motivation that can then be invested in studying: learning English, starting or re-starting education, setting new goals in life.

Monitoring and evaluation study: The Oltalom Social Network (OSN) database records data on all participants (training attendance, physical state, school results, training activities, any needs or issues, training memo, etc.). The OSN is a client-centered system to monitor the work done, achieve greater transparency, and improve the quality of the work.

Objectives

  • Regular training and tournaments provide a prejudice-free experience for refugees and local youngsters where they can get to know each other by playing football together.
  • The knowledge of Hungarian and customs improves through social contacts with locals.
  • Tournaments provide great opportunities to make new friends and improve language knowledge.
  • Regular sport contributes to the well-being of refugees suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder syndrome.
  • New qualifications, good knowledge of English and positive experiences give young people more self-confidence and the opportunity to escape from their current situation.

Expected results

  • Regular football training in six locations. (three pitches in Budapest, and one each at the correctional institution for girls, the home for unaccompanied minors in Fót, and a local school in Abaújkér)
  • Special support for girls with ten monthly theme sessions to help them face various challenges
  • Support ten specially trained young leaders by means of a scholarship programme
  • rganise six Fair Play Football roadshows bringing various social groups together to play football, challenge stereotypes and reduce social exclusion.
  • 40 children invited to a summer camp.

Partners

FIFA Football for Hope, Fédération hongroise de football, Oltalom Charity Society, streetfootballworld, Homeless World Cup

Sport for protection and social inclusion in Egypt

Location and general information

Context

By January 2017, Egypt had taken in over 191,000 UNHCR-registered refugees and asylum-seekers, 40% of whom are children. Of these children, 60% are Syrians, 17% Sudanese and 6% Ethiopians. The remainder are from Iraq, Eritrea, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen. In 2016 the total population of concern was 50% higher than in 2015. Together with workers from other regions such as Asia and clandestine immigrants, the International Organisation for Migration estimates that the overall number of refugees and migrants in the country is probably as high as one million.

A difficult socio-economic environment, increasing living costs, discrimination and language barriers all make it difficult for refugees to integrate. Their physical safety is also cause for concern.

Limited livelihoods and a loss of hope of returning home have contributed to an increase in the number of refugees attempting to reach Europe. At the same time, the child-protection situation is alarming. In addition to the physical and psychological suffering experienced by refugee and migrant children, they are subject to gender-based violence, violence in schools and child labour, and many drop out of school. The lack of educational opportunities contributes to a sense of hopelessness and isolation.

Project Content

Target population

  • 1,500 young people (between the ages of 15 and 22) regardless of nationality, gender and refugee status, migrants and host communities. This makes an average of 150 youngsters per location, with special attention to girls (50%) and children with disabilities (when appropriate support is available).
  • 70 coaches (men and women) – 20 professionals and 50 young leaders / parents – 7 per location
  • 750 carers
  • 2,000 local community members – 200 per site

Project location

Terre des Hommes will run this project at ten sites within the governorates of Greater Cairo and Damietta:

  • in the seven existing family centres
  • in mobile units – youth centres, public spaces, community schools

In its sport for protection and social inclusion programme, Terre des Hommes focuses on community support for refugees and migrants, children and young people, as well as vulnerable Egyptian communities. Sport, and football in particular, plays an important role in healing and helps people cope with physical health issues as well as social, psychological and developmental needs, especially young people who suffer stress and anxiety as a result of their displacement.

The programmes provide a safe, structured and friendly environment for children to share their emotions, strengthen social cohesion, and reinforce educational messages. Girls and young women have the opportunity to take part in sports activities from which they were previously excluded. Recently, activities have been extended to parents, to free them from their daily routine and strengthen family relationships.

Objectives

  • Design a training programme for coaches, including not only technical football skills but also soft skills such as intercultural competence, leadership, conflict resolution, team-building and communication.
  • Organise weekly sports sessions for boys and girls in a safe and child-friendly environment. Once or twice a week per location.
  • Continue to provide weekly psychological activities. The combination of artistic and sports activities has proved to be worthwhile in terms of the impact on the psychosocial wellbeing of children and teenagers. Six days a week.
  • Provide teenagers with life skills and the knowledge they need to adapt to Egyptian society. Three days a week.
  • Provide intergenerational sports activities.
  • Organise cultural and sport events. Once a month.
  • Organise football tournaments. Every six months.
  • Create awareness of child protection, social inclusion and social cohesion during the weekly sessions and campaign during sporting events.
  • Use social media for local communication, featuring short videos and success stories.

Expected results

  1. Refugees and migrant children and teenagers become active community agents to improve their wellbeing and their social inclusion
  2. Sustainable sport together with psychosocial and life-skill activities increase social inclusion and community-based protection for vulnerable children and teenagers
  3. By the end of the project, 70 local coaches, professionals and youth leaders will have enhanced their technical and leadership skills so that they can help youngsters to act as agents of change in their refugee, migrant and host communities
  4. Through social sport activities, 1,500 young people have improved their psychosocial wellbeing (self-esteem, self-confidence) and peer support, allowing them to be more confident when interacting with peers
  5. 1,500 youngsters and 2,750 parents and locals are mobilised to take part in activities that promote community and social cohesion, including gender and disability

Partners

Football for Development in the Czech Republic

Location and general information

Context

INEX is a non-governmental not-for-profit organisation founded in 1991 that supports international work and intercultural education. One of its flagship projects, Football for Development, engages young people in the Czech Republic by means of football-based informal educational activities. The project is run in various urban environments in the Czech Republic (Prague, Usti nad Labem region, Pilsen region, Ostrava region, Karlovy Vary region), where INEX partners with low-threshold clubs, social services, youth clubs, leisure centres, orphanages and youth detention centres. The target group comprises children and teenagers who are at risk of social exclusion or discrimination due to their ethnic background or where they live. Thanks to the work of these organisations, the children and teenagers enjoy a safe space for social interaction and personal development.

The aim is to provide a way for these youngsters to re-engage with society and develop skills they need to be active and responsible citizens. Experience shows that regular planned sporting activities are effective. Football is a comprehensive learning and preventive tool using rules and options to resolve conflicts without violence.

Project content

Because sport, and football in particular, is very popular among young people, it plays an active role in combating discrimination, intolerance, racism, xenophobia and violence. The Football3 methodology*, based on the principle of fair play, inclusion and mutual respect, is used to instil important social values, such as teamwork, discussion, and mutual understanding. It also develops the ability to create rules.

Objectives

The foundation’s support will enable a national network of Football3 leagues to be set up and extend the regional implementation of Football3 methodology into the everyday work of Football for Development’s partner organisations with their target groups. Each league will feature matchdays where groups from different organisations and backgrounds will play together in a spirit of respect and fair play.

  • 4 matchdays in each of the four regions (these will count towards the total points at the end of the respective league competition)
  • 1-day training in the use of Football3 methodology and to endorse the role of mediator
  • 1 workshop per region before the league starts to prepare the participants for the special football format
  • 2 national coordination meetings to arrange the schedule, participation criteria and guidelines and the evaluation process
  • 1 national final matchday to be held in one of the regions and organised as a public event. Two teams from each region will qualify for the finals.

Expected results

  • Lay the foundation for regular Football3 league matches.
  • Create a sustainable and independent network of Football3 leagues throughout the Czech Republic.
  • Focus on educating youngsters in targeted communities and encourage their continued involvement in the activities after reaching adulthood.
  • These individuals will work as role models in their communities to share and multiply the ideas and principles of the project.

* Football3 methodology is used by the streetfootballworld network. It harnesses the educational potential of street football by ensuring that dialogue and fair play are integral to the game. Its overall objective is to promote life skills and empower young people to become leaders. The emphasis is on resolving conflict through dialogue.

Partners