Just Play

Location and general information

Context

Sport for Development is a critical component of the Oceania Football Confederation’s approach to helping to build stronger Pacific Island communities.

With obesity and diabetes on the rise, research indicates that only 29% of children in the Cook Islands, Fiji, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu attend regular physical education classes,[1] with less than 25% of children in these countries practising 60 minutes or more of sport a day.[2] More than 50% of children choose soft drinks instead of water, which is a major contributor to weight gain. More than 27% of children are overweight and obese as early as age 13.[3]

Children with disabilities experience discrimination, exclusion and barriers to being widely accepted, while all girls are marginalized and face inequalities in education, decision-making processes and access to health services.

Evidence shows that poverty, hunger and lack of access to services remain major challenges for children in the targeted countries. One in four children live below the poverty line[4]. Children in general are exposed to high levels of violence at home and at school, and more than 50% of children aged 13–15 years report being bullied[5], 26% have attempted suicide[6], 12% report having no close friends[7], and 80% of children experience some form of direct violence or abuse[8].

With low levels of literacy and up to 30% of young people aged 15–24 actually illiterate, employment opportunities are limited, resulting in high unemployment rates among young people in the Pacific region.[9]

Between 2009 and 2017, the Pacific region was affected by 44 natural disasters. Vanuatu and Fiji were hit by category 5 tropical cyclones in 2015 and 2016 that affected nearly 1 million people, including 450,000 children. Fiji, the Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu suffered 30 of the 44 natural disasters that struck the region,[10] with children on average constituting between a third and a half of those most severely affected.[11]

Through the provision of structured Sport for Development interventions, UNICEF Pacific seeks to reduce the risks associated with non-communicable diseases, child protection, gender and social inequality. These efforts were extended to humanitarian response with the success of the Just Play emergency programme.

Working with key partners such as the OFC, UNICEF Pacific seeks to build confidence in children and young people and create access to quality sports activities, educational platforms, advocacy campaigns and public dialogue through active participation.

[1] World Health Organization, Global School-Health Based Survey Country Fact Sheets for Cook Islands (2015), Fiji (2016), Samoa (2011), Solomon Islands (2011), Tonga (2017) and Vanuatu (2011).

[2] Secretariat of the Pacific Community and UNICEF Pacific, The State of Pacific Youth: Opportunities and obstacles, Bluebird Printery, Fiji, 2011.

[3] World Health Organization, Global School-Health Based Survey Country Fact Sheets for Cook Islands (2011), Fiji (2010), Samoa (2011), Solomon Islands (2011), Tonga (2010) and Vanuatu (2011).

5 UNICEF Pacific, ‘Child Protection Programme Brief’, UNICEF Pacific, Suva, Fiji, 2014.

[5] World Health Organization, Global School-Health Based Survey Country Fact Sheets for Cook Islands (2011), Fiji (2010), Nauru (2011), Niue (2010), Samoa (2011), Solomon Islands (2011), Tonga (2010), Tuvalu (2013) and Vanuatu (2011).

[6] Secretariat of the Pacific Community and UNICEF Pacific, The State of Pacific Youth: Opportunities and obstacles, Bluebird Printery, Fiji, 2011.

[7] World Health Organization, Global School-Health Based Survey Country Fact Sheets for Cook Islands (2011), Fiji (2010), Samoa (2011), Solomon Islands (2011), Tonga (2010) and Vanuatu (2011).

[8] UNICEF Pacific, ‘Child Protection Programme Brief’, UNICEF Pacific, Suva, Fiji, 2014.

[9] UNICEF, ‘Child-Centred Risk Assessment: Regional Synthesis of UNICEF Assessments in Asia’, UNICEF, Nepal, 2014.

[10] UNICEF Pacific, WASH Programme Data, UNICEF, Suva, Fiji, 2014.

[11] UNICEF, ‘Child-Centred Risk Assessment: Regional Synthesis of UNICEF Assessments in Asia’, UNICEF, Nepal, 2014.

Project Content

Just Play is a community-engagement Sport for Development programme developed by the OFC to improve the lives of children and teenagers aged 6–16 by means of football.

The programme engages children in a series of interactive sessions that include social messages aligned to the four key programming pillars: health and wellness, gender equality, social inclusion and child protection. Through active participation, Just Play helps children to develop healthy lifestyle habits and become confident in their abilities; encourages gender equality; promotes social inclusion; and emphasises that sport is for everyone.

The programme aims to reduce the risks associated with, and vulnerability to, endemic social issues, such as the prevalence of violence against women and children, gender inequality and social exclusion, by integrating social messages into the sessions – for example, the importance of reporting bullying and other types of violence. In doing so, the programme promotes an understanding of the importance of regular participation in physical exercise and its impact on issues such as bullying, violence and social inclusion to enable positive social and behaviour change.

Just Play also facilitates the development of critical life skills applicable both on and off the field of play, including the acceptance of rules, teamwork, respect, decision-making and fair play.

The 16-week school-based programme is delivered in primary schools during class time with the support of teachers, while the 48-week community-based programme is delivered outside school with the support of community stakeholders.

The Just Play emergency programme is now a full-scale emergency response programme that uses football to communicate critical messages about safe water, personal safety and preparedness.

Just Play supports programming activities by working with local stakeholders in areas most likely to be affected by natural disasters.

By focusing on vulnerability, the programme leverages existing content to support coping in the wake of a natural disaster, and specifically the emotional recovery of children within an emergency context.

Objectives

Just Play is run with the support of trained coaches and equipment packs containing footballs, cones, bibs, activity manuals and other resources that enable children to learn healthy lifestyle habits and social skills that focus on:

  • Health and wellness, by reducing the risk factors associated with non-communicable diseases (NCDs) through healthier lifestyle decisions and choices;
  • Gender equality, by changing perceptions towards women and girls, and creating pathways to empower women and girls to realize their human rights;
  • Social inclusion, by changing perceptions towards those disadvantaged on the basis of their identity or ability, and creating equal opportunity for their full inclusion in society;
  • Child protection, by increasing understanding of child protection issues, and the availability of safe/protective environments, including in sports contexts, through tailored advocacy campaigns, e.g. #ENDViolence and REDcard;
  • Education, by facilitating the development of important life skills applicable both on and off the field of play, including the acceptance of rules, decision-making, teamwork, overcoming adversity, showing respect, and expressive play;
  • Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), by supporting the development of positive WASH behaviours and practices in schools and communities, and in times of emergencies;
  • Emergency, by building reliance and supporting the emotional recovery of children and adolescents in the wake of natural disasters and conflict.

Just Play supports the upskilling of teachers and community volunteers to deliver programme activities that facilitate capacity-building, ownership and accountability in social change through a community based, child-centred approach.

  • 284,929: The number of children and adolescents who have taken part in the Just Play programme throughout the Pacific region since 2009;
  • 5,102: The number of teachers and community volunteers trained to help deliver the Just Play programme in the Pacific region since 2009;
  • 17,083: Number of children and teenagers who have taken part in Just Play emergency programme festivals in the wake of a natural disaster in the Pacific region.

Image: OFC - Just Play

Expected Results

Just Play is positively impacting children and teenagers through a sport-based curriculum that helps them to develop the life skills necessary to make consistent, long-term healthy lifestyle choices that promote health and wellness, gender equality, social inclusion and child protection, even in post-emergency contexts.

After the programme:

  • 81% of children choose to drink water instead of soda
  • 72% of boys report they enjoy playing football with girls
  • 85% of children report they acknowledge and celebrate differences
  • 59% of children report they feel safe following a natural disaster

 

Our Partners

Malawian Youth Kicks Back

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Malawi
Start date 01/01/2019
End date -
Cost of the project €240,000
Foundation funding €54,886
Project identifier AFR-2018652
Partners SIMAVI

Context

The UEFA Foundation for Children’ support will help develop the sporting dimension of the project, which aims to combat the gender stereotype, that women are inferior to men, in Malawi. As a consequence, girls and young women feel vulnerable and are often the target of sexual and gender-based violence.

Project content

The Centre for Alternatives for Victimised Women and Children (CAVWOC) organises sports activities, such as football and karate, to bring vulnerable girls and boys together in a setting of greater equality.

The goal is for the children to learn mutual respect, develop self-esteem and start a process of resilience. Combining sports training with information on sexual and reproductive health rights will help girls and boys protect themselves.

If the girls play football with boys, the masculinity related to the game will disappear. This will give an enormous boost to their self-esteem and will be one step towards breaking the gender stereotype. Sport will help the girls to work in a team and develop their objective-setting skills. Working with coaches, trainers, and teammates to win games and meet objectives is great practice for success later in life. Sport will also make them better able to accept defeat and emerge stronger from it. Being a team player will make it easier for them to work with others and resolve issues, whether on the field or in their personal lives.

CAVWOC will set up 12 girls’ football teams and organise a football tournament, inviting successful national female players to take part. This experience will boost the girls’ feeling of empowerment.

CAVWOC has run a pilot programme to teach the girls karate, and it has increased their self-esteem and confidence and even the boys are more understanding and treat the girls equally. In addition, the karate training helps them to defend themselves.

In addition to the sports activities, boys and girls will take part in the information campaign about sexual and reproductive rights. We aim to reduce the inequalities and power imbalance between boys and girls. We believe that men and boys are not only part of the problem in gender imbalance, but also part of the solution. This is one way to increase solidarity with girls. Male champions can influence their peers about how boys and men can support girls.

Beneficiaries:

  • 1,000 vulnerable children aged between 16 and 18 living in rural areas
  • More than 76% are girls
  • Around 5% are disabled children
  • 5% are orphans
  • 25% live in difficult social contexts

Objectives

The overall objective is to reduce the number of women and children that encounter rights violations in Malawi. The project provides infrastructure and support to enable communities to acknowledge and value the laws that protect and allow all women and children to live healthy lives and sustain themselves financially.

A society in which women and children feel safe and protected from gender-based abuse and are economically strengthened.

Project activities

  • Educate 30 boys and girls on sexual rights and health (SRH) and a gender-transformative approach (GTA).
  • Support girls’ football
  • Raise awareness of teen pregnancies and gender equality
  • Teach girls karate
  • Train girls in leadership
  • Communication with international female football stars

Expected results

  • 15 girls and 15 boys trained in SRH and GTA
  • 8,000 youngsters taught awareness of teen pregnancies and gender equality
  • 12 girls’ football teams set up
  • 30 girls taught karate
  • 30 girls trained in leadership skills
  • Nationwide campaign on female empowerment with the support of international female football players

Partner

Tusobola

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Uganda
Start date 01/01/2019
End date 12/31/2020
Cost of the project €250,000
Foundation funding €100,000
Project identifier AFR-2018270
Partners Right To Play

Context

Kampala has an estimated population of over 1.5 million according to the 2014 national census. It has 62 informal settlements that are home to 560,000 families, most of which do not meet minimum humanitarian standards for access to water, shelter and sanitation facilities. The impact of poor sanitation, coupled with the lack of hygiene knowledge and bad practices, is evident in Kampala, especially among low-income households.

According to a Right To Play assessment report, Kamwokya is one of the most poorly planned and congested settlements in Kampala. The quality of public sanitation is still poor and there is a serious lack of sewer systems. It is estimated that fewer than 10% of the residents make use of these systems, while the rest use on-site or collective sanitation facilities with a few well-maintained public toilets. Kamwokya has both public and private health service providers, public and private education services at primary and secondary level, and no public tertiary education institution. The teacher-to-pupil ratio remains as high as 1:110, reducing access to effective and quality teaching that caters for children’s needs, especially girls and vulnerable children, contributing to the high youth unemployment rate in the city.

Based on studies carried out by the Uganda Youth Development Link and other organisations, the key challenges in Kamwokya include child prostitution, high school drop-out rates, high teenage pregnancies, child labour, drug abuse, youth unemployment, absolute poverty, poor health services, child abuse and limited education opportunities for most children and teenagers. These challenges also negatively affect overall community development.

Project content

The Tusobola (Improving Quality Education through Sport and Play) project aims to enhance the quality of children’s education in Kamwokya. In a series of training courses, school teachers and community coaches from youth associations will be equipped with the tools to run regular, good-quality sport and play-activities. These activities will enhance the life skills of the child beneficiaries, and address issues of child protection, gender equality and health. The project will take a proactive approach towards engaging community stakeholders (parents, caregivers, education authorities, community-based organisation, local leadership) to address barriers to education and positive youth development in Kamwokya.

Objectives

Right To Play uses sport and play as a way to develop life skills and increase knowledge in children and teenagers, so that they are well equipped to rise above their challenges. The Right To Play methodology comprises several manuals of football for development, positive child and youth development and play-based learning. This approach ensures that:

    • children and teenagers learn football skills through age- and developmentally appropriate activities while gaining important life skills;
    • they learn how to make better life choices;
    • positive attitudes, values, and behaviours are promoted;
    • children have access to good quality education in a supportive environment, using play-based learning.

Project activities

The project will comprise the following key activities:

  • Train 40 teachers in gender-responsive play-based methodologies. Teachers will attend a series of courses, be monitored continuously, and take part in themed workshops to meet specific needs. This professional development approach contributes to the project’s sustainability;
  • Train young people to become football coaches in partnership with the Ugandan Football Federation (FUFA);
  • Build networks of teachers so they can exchange information about good practices;
  • Raise parents’ awareness of the benefits of play-based learning;
  • Teach girls about menstrual health and reusable sanitary pads;
  • Organise regular sports and play activities in schools and communities to give children the opportunity to learn life skills, such as self-confidence, communication and leadership outside the classroom;
  • Organise stakeholder and community review meetings to share best practices and project progress;
  • Advocate for healthy and positive learning environments by ensuring that environment-related health risks are minimised or avoided altogether.

Expected results

  • Children and teenagers engage in regular sport and play-based learning activities
  • Teachers and coaches are trained in child-friendly and participatory play-based learning, gender equality and creating a positive learning environment
  • Improved school attendance rates among children and teenagers
  • Partner schools have an established safe and positive learning environment

The programme is expected to benefit 3,500 youngsters aged 6 to 18, 40 teachers and 20 coaches, as well as parents, caregivers, and other community members in Kamwokya.

Partner

Using football to end child marriage and FGM in Tanzania

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Tanzania
Start date 02/01/2017
End date 01/31/2020
Cost of the project €824,000
Foundation funding €39,186
Project identifier AFR-2018571
Partners Plan International UK

Context

Tanzania has one of the highest rates of child marriage globally, with over 37% of girls married before their 18th birthday. Early marriage not only has a significant impact on girls’ health, well-being and personal development, but every year more than 8,000 girls in Tanzania drop out of school due to child marriage and pregnancy. Moreover, the practice of female genital mutilation (FGM) is closely tied to marriage in Tanzania. Complex social pressures can force girls into having the procedure, but it can be extremely dangerous. To give girls a future beyond an early marriage, and to enable them to say no to FGM, they need help in claiming their rights and changing the minds and attitudes of their communities. In this context, Plan International UK has set up a project to work specifically in the regions of Geita and Mara. In Mara 40% of girls are subjected to FGM; significantly above the national average of 15%.

Project content

We are seeking to create real change in people’s attitudes towards girls and young women, to enable these individuals to exercise their rights and to have the potential to be more than just a wife or mother. To do this, we will engage the support of decision-makers and seek to change the minds of those in charge.

Additionally, in order to include the most at risk and most marginalised girls, namely those who have dropped out of school, the project is working with village leaders to identify girls living in remote areas with disabilities and without parental care. Girls are at the heart of this project. We will be working directly and extensively with them to give them the skills, knowledge, attitudes and power they need to make their own choices.

Objectives

With the support of the UEFA Foundation for Children, and by engaging young people through football, the objective is to help girls raise their voices against the traditions which affect their rights. Reaching young people through peer support and young women through vocational training, we will work to create lasting change in several communities by engaging with men, women, leaders and government officials. The ultimate goal is to use football to end child marriage and FGM in Tanzania, as well as to empower girls and young women.

Project activities

  • Build a support network for girls by setting-up 49 girls’ clubs in 31 schools with the aim of creating a safe and supportive space for girls who are likely to face the challenge of traditional harmful practices.
  • Encourage girls to raise their voices by delivering training in life skills to members of girls’ clubs during sessions, helping them to build self-esteem and self-worth.
  • Bring issues onto the football pitch and into the open. 40 coaches (30% female) will be trained to deliver football drills for 1,470 girls and 620 boys. The events will use football to spark discussions and boost knowledge about early marriage and FGM. Generally speaking, football will be used to attract support.
  • Turn influential women into champions of change. We aim to secure the support of female decision-makers and empower them to raise their voices against harmful practices.
  • Give vulnerable girls the chance to earn a living. In parallel with working alongside influential women, 160 of the most marginalised girls and women aged 15-24 will take part in a livelihoods development scheme. They will be trained in starting their own businesses and with their own independent income they will be better-equipped to negotiate the pressures of early marriage.
  • Help communities support young people to reject FGM and early marriage. We are seeking to create real change in people’s attitudes towards girls and young women, so that these individuals can exercise their rights and have the potential to be more than just a wife or mother. To do this, we will engage the support of decision-makers and endeavour to change the minds of those in charge.
  • Effectively engage with communities and gain government support. To achieve real and lasting change, it is vital that local leaders work with the project. We will meet with the key decision-makers at district, ward and village level to introduce the project and ensure their support. We will make everyone aware of the relevant policies and laws about children’s rights and examine the impact of early marriage and FGM on girls and their communities.
  • Strengthen and support local systems for protecting girls. This will be achieved through establishing and supporting child protection teams at government level, collaborating with these teams to maximise their effectiveness, and influencing the government’s decisions by working closely with national and district authorities.

Expected results

In total, 1,470 girls will be helped to raise their voices against the traditions which affect their rights. Through peer support networks we will reach a further 2,100 young people, and 160 young women will be provided with vocational training.

Overall, the objective is to create lasting change in 31 communities by engaging with leaders and government officials. The project has been developed with local partners and has a clear definition of the roles and responsibilities, thus ensuring sustainability of the aims and achievements. The expected results will be to spread awareness, knowledge and support among young people, and girls and women will be empowered to make informed decisions about child marriage and FGM.

Partner

Education with a Kick

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location India
Start date 01/01/2019
End date -
Cost of the project €165,541
Foundation funding €112,000
Project identifier ASI-2018579
Partners Oscar Foundation, Street Football World

Context

School dropout rates are increasing in Mumbai’s slums. Underprivileged children are being sent to work to help meet their families’ needs. Entering the labour market at such a young age and working long days in dangerous conditions is disastrous for their mental and physical development. They are exposed to a higher risk of addiction to alcohol and drugs.

Of the children who fail to complete their education, 67% are girls. The main reason for this is child marriage, which parents think will give their daughters economic security. However, cutting short girls’ education and pushing them into repeated early pregnancies limits their opportunities. The cycle of poverty therefore self-perpetuates.

Project content

The project in Mumbai comprises football and education programmes that rely on the power of football to bring about social change. The game is used as a hook to engage young people in a variety of activities, but also to teach them about key social topics such as teamwork, respect and fair play. The life skills learned through football help empower individuals and enhance their psychosocial well-being, increasing their resilience, self-esteem and motivation. Activities aimed at less privileged children and young people can help reduce the number of boys and girls who are forced to drop out of education.

New digital learning centres will be set up in four targeted communities, creating an essential link between on- and off-field activities. Twice a week throughout the year, more than 800 children will have the opportunity to boost their self-esteem, confidence, teamwork skills and football ability by participating in football and life skills sessions.

Objectives

  • Gender equality and women’s empowerment: there is a clear correlation between higher levels of female education and lower fertility rates. Population growth and climate change are also directly linked, so investing in girls’ education and promoting girls’ reproductive rights can play a powerful role in combating climate change. Through our football programmes, girls improve their confidence and self-esteem, and are given the chance to become leaders and challenge female stereotypes in their community.
  • Sanitation and hygiene: the urban population is increasing rapidly, putting enormous pressure on water and sanitation services. One of the main goals of the football and life skills programme is to tackle the taboos related to sanitation and hygiene, promote behaviour change amongst children and raise awareness of the importance of sanitation and hygiene.
  • Waste management: the inherent link between a clean environment and participation in sport is part of what makes football a powerful tool for communicating environmental messages to groups of young people and encouraging them to take action to clean up their own environment.

Project activities

Sessions will be held in local open spaces. During each session, issues such as dropping out of school, child marriage, child labour or health and hygiene will be discussed. If players identify as being at risk of dropping out of school, they will be invited to attend informal education and computer classes at one of the four education hubs in Mumbai, improving their chances of passing exams and providing a platform for future employment opportunities.

 

Expected results

  • Reduce the dropout rate in years 1 to 7 from 13% to 10%, with 90% of children participating in our programmes.
  • Reduce the dropout rate in years 5 to 7 from 16% to 10%, with 90% of children participating in our programmes.
  • Increase by 20% the number of year 7 children participating in our programmes who successfully make the transition to year 8.

Partner

Good Health and Well-being through Football

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Lesotho
Start date 06/01/2019
End date -
Cost of the project €244,210
Foundation funding €122,105
Project identifier AFR-2018543
Partners Kick4Life

Context

Over the last few years we have become aware that the various health challenges facing young people in Lesotho are interconnected and that there is a need for a holistic approach to health education.

These challenges include the following:

  • HIV is prevalent in Lesotho and young people are vulnerable to infection due to a culture of multi-partner relationships, pressure to have sex at a young age, a lack of access to HIV testing and counselling, stigma and discrimination.
  • Drug and alcohol abuse are another key driver of new HIV infections.
  • Both poverty and food insecurity contribute to the propagation of diseases such as cancer, diabetes and respiratory illnesses.
  • Poor standards of hygiene lead to the spread of preventable communicable diseases such as tuberculosis.
  • Road accidents kill or injure more than 1,500 people every year in Maseru, the capital of Lesotho.

The young people taking part in the programme come from a range of underprivileged and vulnerable backgrounds including:

  • Street children
  • HIV+ youth
  • Orphans
  • Teenage mothers
  • Children and teenagers living in poverty
  • At-risk children and vulnerable girls
  • Children engaged in child labour

Project content

The project includes the development and delivery of a holistic and integrated health and well-being programme for 3,000 children and teenagers in the Maseru district of Lesotho, using football to engage, educate and motivate positive behaviour change.

The programme will focus on key health challenges faced by vulnerable girls and boys, including:

  • Communicable and noncommunicable diseases
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Nutrition
  • Sanitation and hygiene
  • Road safety
  • Mental health
  • Access to health services
  • Environmental protection

There will also be a strong gender-equality and life-skills component, with personal development critical to ensuring that acquired knowledge leads to sustainable changes in attitude and behaviour.

Objectives

The project will conduct a mapping exercise to identify partners in other districts of Lesotho that can be trained to deliver the programme going forward. This will ensure effective future scalability of the initiative to reach many more vulnerable young people in Lesotho. The programme will also be developed with a high level of flexibility so that it can be adapted to a variety of health challenges, offering potential for delivery by other organizations beyond Lesotho and for the most pressing health challenges in any given community.

Project activities

The programme includes the following sessions:

  1. Welcome to Good Health & Well-being through Football: A focus on building self-esteem and gaining the confidence to be active members of the programme. It considers the importance of making your own choices, building a support structure and setting goals.
  2. Tackling HIV: Covers the basics of the HIV virus and encourages healthy behaviours that prevent infection.
  3. Goal Protection: Promotes the importance of protection and prevention when it comes to sexual health.
  4. Be Fair (gender equality): Focuses on promoting gender equality, challenges stereotypes about the role of women in society.
  5. Only Girl Goals: Reinforces the importance of gender equality and valuing the contribution of women and girls in all areas of society.
  6. Nutrition & HIV: Explores how good nutrition and regular meals can boost the immune system of someone living with HIV, and how diet can support the effectiveness of medication.
  7. Healthy versus Unhealthy: Empowers participants by giving them the knowledge to judge what is healthy, and what is not.
  8. Be Healthy and Be Clean: Focuses on healthy eating and exercise and how developing healthy behaviours can reduce the risk of non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and heart disease. The session also covers the importance of basic hygiene and sanitation in preventing illnesses such as diarrhoea and food poisoning.
  9. Balanced Football: Focuses on eating healthily and the importance of a balanced diet in maintaining good health.
  10. Planet Football: Focuses on the importance of protecting the environment, including topics such as recycling, single-use plastic and rubbish collections. The session includes a group discussion about how they can make a difference to the environment in their own communities.
  11. Crossbar Soap of Challenge: Reinforces the importance of cleanliness and promotes safe practices regarding hygiene and sanitation.
  12. Be Safe on the Road: Focuses on road safety, avoiding risky behaviours and encouraging safe practices when crossing roads.
  13. Traffic Football: Reinforces the importance of avoiding risky behaviours for pedestrians and the importance of crossing roads safely.
  14. Balanced Future: Brings together everything learned in the programme. Each participant is helped to develop an individual plan and goals to improve their health in the longer term.

The programme will be delivered by our experienced and inspirational coaches through local partnerships, as well as reaching out-of-school youth through an extensive network of community-based organizations and community mobilisers.

Expected results

  • 3000 children and young people complete the programme, demonstrating improved knowledge and attitude related to health
  • 3000 children and young people have improved health and well-being
  • 15 young people trained as programme coaches
  • 300 young people have improved access to health services through referrals to external health provision
  • 1000 children and young people linked to further development opportunities with Kick4Life

The project will include a robust approach to monitoring and evaluation that will assess changes in knowledge, attitude and behaviour, in line with the specific targets of SDG 3.

 

Partner

Football for Change outreach project

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Cambodia
Start date 01/15/2019
End date -
Cost of the project €21,930
Foundation funding €21,480
Project identifier ASI-2018798
Partners Indochina Starfish Foundation (ISF)

Context

As Cambodia continues to recover from the impact of the Khmer Rouge’s destructive reign, corruption and inequality remain prevalent and extreme poverty continues to affect young people, who make up almost 60% of the population. The pressure on young people to find employment is very high and school dropout rates, especially in rural areas reflect this. Children as young as five work to help financially support their families and are often taken out of school to make ends meet. The poverty they experience not only denies them the chance of education, but also strips them of their right to be children and to play.

Across the country, particularly in rural areas, 19% of girls marry before their 18th birthday. Sporting opportunities for girls are very limited, and most are excluded from participating in sport and the social engagement that comes with it. In this way, disadvantaged and marginalised children and young people miss out on interaction with their peers and the vital life skills that are not taught in the classroom but are learned through sport, play and socialisation.

Project content

This programme will work directly with 500 disadvantaged children and 200 young people and adults who live in communities where poverty, social exclusion and lack of opportunity regularly lead to harmful behaviour. It will provide opportunities for children to access their right to play and right to education, promoting healthy life choices, equality and diversity.

Objectives

  • The Indochina Starfish Foundation (ISF) believes every child has the right to education, healthcare and play. Therefore, the project aims to:
    • provide children, including girls, with access to sport and play;
    • improve children’s health and well-being;
    • provide a safe space for children to explore social issues such as children’s rights and child abuse, gender equality and disability inclusion, HIV, alcohol and drugs, and gambling;
    • develop children’s confidence, leadership, teamwork, problem-solving and resilience;
    • empower girls and women and change local perceptions through sport;
    • promote and encourage young people, especially girls, to remain in school.

Project activities

The pilot outreach project is about empowering coaches in rural areas to provide access to sport and learning to socially disadvantaged children in Cambodia. ISF will start running three coach development courses in 2019.

Two hundred coaches and aspiring coaches from schools, community organisations and NGOs around the country will participate in five intensive days of training focusing on football for social impact. The training, developed in partnership with Coaches Across Continents (CAC), will teach participants to deliver social impact football training using fun games and activities, engaging children in locally relevant social issues such as gender equality, disability and social inclusion, drug and alcohol abuse, gambling, education and health.

Participants will be trained to deliver a bespoke 12-month ISF/CAC social impact curriculum while developing children’s football skills, confidence, leadership, teamwork and decision-making skills in a fun and safe environment.

Expected results

Throughout the course of the pilot project, we expect the 20 ISF-supported coaches to run 480 outreach sessions, reaching approximately 500 socially deprived children, and three coach development courses focusing on social impact through football. In addition to the 700 direct beneficiaries of this project, the objective is to have 3,000 indirect beneficiaries.

Partner

Unity and Peace

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Jamaica
Start date 01/01/2019
End date 12/31/2019
Cost of the project €5,000,000
Foundation funding €62,152
Project identifier AME–2018382
Partners Fight for Peace International

Context

Young people in the six target communities are growing up in risk environments that influence their likelihood of becoming victims or perpetrators of violence. The root causes of youth violence tackled in this programme are:

  • gang activity in the community
  • difficult family life due to absent parents, harsh physical discipline, or neglect
  • poverty and lack of opportunities to escape poverty
  • lack of pro-social and personal development recreational activities
  • high unemployment
  • low educational attainment
  • limited access to psycho-social support

Project content

Fight for Peace (FFP) combines boxing and martial arts with education and personal development to help young people realise their potential despite living in communities affected by crime, violence and social exclusion. Fight for Peace coordinates the Safer Communities Programme (SCP) in Jamaica, which brings together over 30 entities – government agencies, sports federations, youth development and violence-prevention organisations – to work in communities with high levels of violence. The Unity and Peace project uses holistic programmes covering five pillars (sport, education, employment, youth leadership and psycho-social support) using the collective impact framework.

The project has been launched in six communities in Kingston with high levels of violence: Hannah Town, Denham Town, Trench Town, Tivoli Gardens, Fletchers Land and Parade Gardens.

Fight for Peace also works informally with the Jamaica Wrestling Federation and the Jamaica Rugby League Association. Funding from the UEFA Foundation for Children will enable the Jamaica Football Federation to be included by integrating school and community football teams.

Beneficiaries:

  • More than 1,670 young people living in urban areas
  • Average age from 10 to 12 years and 95% under 18
  • 56% male and 46% female

Objectives

FFP has developed an integrated and holistic five-pillar methodology that it applies to all its projects and activities. The objective is to give young people all the support they need to become champions in life.

Boxing and martial arts: to promote respect, discipline, self-control, feelings of belonging and self-esteem, and encourage young people to join the programme

Education: to offer support and educational courses for young people who are outside formal learning environments or who have learning difficulties

Employability: to help young people access the job market through training, vocational courses and referrals to job opportunities through a network of partners in the private sector

Support services: a multidisciplinary social-support team provides services, including individual mentoring, social, medical and legal referrals, home visits and community outreach

Youth leadership: through youth councils who represent the organisation externally and liaise with staff on strategy and programme development

Project activities

  • Sports sessions (boxing, martial arts and football) delivered at community centres and schools by coaches trained to integrate personal development skills into sessions (50 sessions per week)
  • Personal development sessions led by trained facilitators from youth development and violence prevention NGOs and/or psychologists and social workers from FFP (12 sessions per month for the six communities)
  • Cross-community recreational activities and tournaments (two tournaments in the first six months)
  • Eight places branded as sport for development sites and safe spaces for children
  • Psychological first aid and sport for development training for all participating coaches, allowing for long-term integration of personal development into sport in schools and the community
  • Training of coaching assistants to provide qualified coaches for disadvantaged communities
  • Partnership with the GC Foster College of Sport and Physical Education to provide coaching courses and certification for all participating coaches
  • Integration with the sport and behaviour change programme of the ministry of education, information and youth/social development commission to allow for policy development and future programming within schools and communities

Expected results

Young people who take part in regular free sports and personal development will report sustained improvements to health and well-being.

  • 1,800 young people practising sport
  • 1,450 sports sessions
  • 72 personal development sessions
  • 4 tournaments
  • 70% improving their health and fitness
  • 4 coach training courses
  • 60% improve the quality of their relationships with friends, family and other adults
  • 60% of those who may have negative behaviour report a positive change, e.g. reduced involvement in crime, respect for authority
  • 60% view their futures more positively

Partner

Football4Good

Location and general information

Context

Due to its central geographic location and as a strong economic partner in Southeast Asia, Thailand is a regional hub for migrants as a place of origin, transit and destination. Tens of thousands of migrant children currently live in construction site camps in Thailand (Baan Dek and UNICEF, 2018). As their parents have come to Thailand to work, these children live in precarious temporary shelters with limited access to education, health or security. They are exposed to various forms of abuse, violence and neglect. None of them have the opportunity to escape from the slums and socialise with others, so they are forced to stay and play in unsafe surroundings with little stimulation or interaction with others. Their vulnerable situation means that they are at risk of being deprived of their basic rights. Moreover, the limited opportunities for socialisation and play mean that these children have no opportunity to just be children.

Project content

Baan Dek Foundation believes that football is a necessary component of childhood development, a fertile ground for learning essential skills such as teamwork, self-esteem, confidence, good sportsmanship and discipline. The Football4Good programme encourages positive peer relationships among children from different ethnic backgrounds through coaching, physical activity, the provision of quality sports equipment and by training the foundation’s staff in sports development. The programme also aims to promote gender equality by empowering marginalised girls and young women.

This year Baan Dek Foundation wants to go a step further by emphasising the development of community leadership through its new programme, Football4Good and youth empowerment. The idea is to train and empower youth peer educators to deliver regular football training sessions in the communities where they live. With an increased understanding of social issues and how to better promote values such as equality and tolerance, the youth peer educators will be able to act as role models for marginalised children and young people living in urban slums and construction site camps.

The youth peer educators will also have direct involvement in improvements to their living environment. They will work with Baan Dek Foundation staff to design and implement new football pitches, more child-safe spaces and other improvements to their communities’ physical infrastructure. This will give children living in their community the opportunities to benefit from safe areas in which to play football outside of training sessions.

In addition to providing football sessions for the community and during children’s school holidays, the foundation aims to inspire children to pursue sports and to create awareness of the benefits of sports for development by inviting local professional footballers to come and present their career at a local school.

Objectives

Football is a crucial multipurpose tool for social workers and can positively influence children in need of support at a very fundamental level. The Football4Good and youth empowerment programme aims to help connect marginalised communities through regular football sessions, as well as providing sports equipment for targeted vulnerable communities. Children and teenagers will develop motor skills, improve their levels of physical activity, have the chance to socialise with their peers and build new social relationships within communities where violence between various ethnic groups may sometimes be a daily occurrence. Furthermore, football teaches these children to become team players, to integrate into and socialise in a diverse group and to practice good sportsmanship. All of these benefits, in addition to simply providing a fun activity for the children, make football and sports education in general a primary focus for the foundation’s community programmes.

Project Activities

Football is a crucial multipurpose tool for social workers and can positively influence children in need of support at a very fundamental level. The Football4Good and youth empowerment programme aims to help connect marginalised communities through regular football sessions, as well as providing sports equipment for targeted vulnerable communities. Children and teenagers will develop motor skills, improve their levels of physical activity, have the chance to socialise with their peers and build new social relationships within communities where violence between various ethnic groups may sometimes be a daily occurrence. Furthermore, football teaches these children to become team players, to integrate into and socialise in a diverse group and to practice good sportsmanship. All of these benefits, in addition to simply providing a fun activity for the children, make football and sports education in general a primary focus for the foundation’s community programmes.

Expected results

  • More than 100 football sessions a year held as part of Smile Holiday programmes and in marginalised communities.
  • More than 400 children a year attending Smile Holidays and community Football4Good sessions.
  • More than 3,500 attendees of Smile Holidays and community football sessions cumulatively.
  • 150 girls and young women attending Smile Holidays and community football sessions.
  • Seven communities where football, sports facilities and child-safe environments are improved and made accessible to children.
  • 50 balls provided to communities and youth peer educators.
  • 40 youth peer educators a year trained on the value of football.

Partners

Street children back to school

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Afghanistan
Start date 01/02/2018
End date -
Cost of the project €201,000
Foundation funding €98,735
Project identifier ASI-2018475
Partners Action for Development (AfD)

Context

According to UNICEF 3.5 million Afghan children aged between 5 and 17 are missing out on school. Approximately 2.1 million 6 to 14-year-olds are involved in some form of child labour, often in jobs that are hazardous to their health and safety. They face a high risk of injury or death from road accidents, suicide bombings and explosions; they are often victims of verbal, physical and sexual abuse; they are exposed to concentrated air and noise pollution, and generally endure difficult living conditions. Many of these children are their families’ only breadwinners and their parents, most of whom are illiterate, feel they have no other choice but to put their children to work. As a result, these children have no opportunity to attend formal schools.

Street children back to school

Afghanistan is a country characterised by many ethnic divisions, which are often the root causes of violence. In this difficult context, sporting events such as football and cricket have proven to be successful ways in which to bring the population together and break down ethnic barriers. Sport, and football in particular, is an important channel for motivating children to create social change.

Project content

The UEFA Foundation for Children is supporting Action for Development (AfD) in Afghanistan for the second year in a row. The Street children back to school project was established in 2016 and invests in the social and educational development of these children, as well as ways to improve their overall level of health, to ensure they will become productive members of society. Thanks to its unique structure, the school allows these children to combine studies with their work.

 

The project also invests resources in empowering girls, who, until 2007, were banned from playing football in Afghanistan. Today, Kabul alone has 17 women's teams, although there is no training centre and female players still face resistance.

 

Project set-up

In October 2016 AfD founded its first school in one of the most populous districts in Kabul. In September 2018 new schools were opened in two other locations, one in the city centre and one in Khwaja Bughra district to the north, in the same building as the AfD health centre. A dry, secure football pitch has been rented, where children are taken twice a week to play football safely. The schools have seven women taking care of the teaching, cooking and coordinating and one male football coach.

 

Back-to-school activities

The Schools for Street Working Children project aims to reintegrate children into the formal school system. These children have lower-than-expected levels of skills and confidence for children of their age, which makes attending a formal school very difficult.

 

Awareness campaigns

One hundred families with children at the school will be involved in awareness-raising activities. Mothers will be taught about the importance of education, children’s hygiene, disease prevention and the dangers of drugs and prostitution. A special emphasis is placed on issues affecting young girls as they are often the most vulnerable of street children. Awareness campaigns will also reach out to the community elders and leaders of mosques.

 

Local development

Over 200 children have already been enrolled in the project but there is scope to increase this number. The children need to commit to attending the training sessions. Priority is given to orphans and children who have a disabled parent and 50% of the participants must be girls.

Regular health check-ups are to be carried out with the support of the AfD health centre personnel and regular support is provided by a local psychologist.

The Schools for Street Working Children project offers street children the opportunity to play football and sport in general. Currently over 40 children play football. We are working with families who, for cultural reasons, believe their daughters should not play football as it is typically a male sport, to educate them on the importance of sport, and football in particular, in building self-esteem, team building capability and strength overall. Groups are formed according to age and where necessary by gender, and each group has two sessions each week. The school’s tutoring activities are held before or after the sports activities.

Objectives

The aim of the project is to improve the prospects of Kabul’s street working children, assisting them in their social, educational and physical development, and investing in them to ensure they will become productive members of the society.

The non-formal education approach allows the children to learn through games and activities and enables them to continue with their current activities. By playing football they take back their right to be children.

The objectives of the project are to:

    • continue to increase the number of children attending the schools for street children;
    • provide educational support for street children using innovative tools;
    • provide basic nutritional support and health services, physical and psychological, for children in need;
    • promote children’s physical development and offer opportunities to learn physical skills through football training and sport in general;
    • train educators to use a creative teaching method and train the football coach to engage children, their families and the community by building enthusiasm for football;
    • in the longer term, reduce the number of illiterate street children through a sustainable approach to education and training;
    • create awareness of the value of education among families and the local community;
    • build synergies with national schools to make it easier for some of these boys and girls to be reintegrated into the formal system.

Project activities

Expected results

  • Street children are able to read, write and do calculations; they also learn to draw.
  • They are aware of their rights and duties and of the concepts of peace and human rights.
  • Street children are in better health and do not have nutritional deficiencies.
  • More children are enrolled in football training.
  • Trainers are trained to be able to teach street children.
  • More children are enrolled in the formal school system, and barriers, such as children’s lack of confidence and readiness, are broken down.
  • Academically stronger children are given financial support to continue their studies.

Partner

Paths to Equity

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Spain
Start date 09/01/2018
End date 12/31/2019
Cost of the project €38,488
Foundation funding €25,988
Project identifier EUR-2018553
Partners Ayuda en Acción

Context

In the Sant Ildefons neighbourhood, a significant number of children and teenagers are at risk of poverty and social exclusion. Their personal development and educational success is conditioned by their families’ socio-economic vulnerability, the lack of educational opportunities, and their national, cultural or ethnic origin. These youngsters’ situation determines and limits equal access to educational innovation projects as well as to leisure activities.

Ayuda en Acción is trying to resolve these difficulties in partnership with the neighbourhood’s primary and secondary schools. Since 2013, it has been running a social involvement programme for children and families at risk of social exclusion. Building a community founded upon solidarity, dignity, equality and mutual respect, Ayuda en Acción improves the lives of around 11,000 children in Spain.

Project content

Ayuda en Acción provides a full range of activities – from school meals and educational innovation projects to employability options for the families, and has developed a project called Paths to Equity, that focuses on sport and leisure activities for children at risk of social exclusion. This project seeks ways to ensure children rights to development and well-being and will be supported by the UEFA Foundation for the 2018/19 academic year and the first quarter of the 2019/20 academic year.

Objectives

  • The project comprises initiatives in six schools with two objectives:
  • Promoting equal opportunities for children at risk of poverty by means of informal education during leisure time
  • Teaching and encouraging the practice of an accessible and necessary sport such as swimming

Project activities

School outings

Six schools will schedule activities during the academic year, such as day trips to various destinations, with a special focus on natural sites. School camps will also be held, offering students the experience of leaving their neighbourhood and spending a few days in nature and practising leisure activities, many of them linked to sport. The school's curriculum includes environmental and sustainability activities.

 

Extracurricular sports activities

It may seem paradoxical, but many children in Sant Ildefons cannot swim, despite the proximity of the beach. Swimming classes are therefore essential for these children. Three schools will receive funding to cover the costs of these extracurricular activities and transport.

Although the schools have a small budget for outings and extracurricular activities, it is clearly insufficient to cover the total cost, so a contribution from families is required. However, the parents cannot afford to pay. The funding therefore ensures the activities can be held.

Expected results

  • Improvement of children’s well-being in Sant Ildefons through social activities and sports
  • 6 schools plan activities during this school year:
  • CEIP Verdaguer, CEIP Montserrat, CEIP Sant Ildefons and CEIP Torre de la Miranda (primary schools)
  • IES Cornellà and IES Maria Aurèlia Capmany (secondary schools)
  • 827 pupils taking part in the project
  • Paths to Equity will support these schools and monitor how the funds are used

Partner

Safe-Hub – EduFootball

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Germany/Austria
Start date 01/12/2018
End date -
Cost of the project €221,796
Foundation funding €74,486
Project identifier EUR - 2018748
Partners AMANDLA, Oliver Kahn Foundation, DFL Foundation, Beisheim Foundation, Coca-Cola Foundation

Context

Even in wealthy countries such as Germany and Austria, social inequality has grown over the last few decades. These growing wealth and resource gaps affect young people and their futures: once a young person has been born into a cycle of poverty, unemployment and inequality, their social mobility is limited. This not only affects access to high-quality education and employment; it also leaves young people vulnerable to violence, discrimination and crime.

AMANDLA is working to break this destructive cycle by offering a constructive alternative: the Safe‑Hub. A Safe-Hub is a place where young people have equal access to opportunities, strive to realise their full potential and dare to dream.

Project content

AMANDLA seeks to create safe spaces that combine the power of football and learning to empower young people and change lives. At the heart of the organisation’s work lies its award-winning approach to youth development: the Safe-Hub social franchise model. Safe-Hubs are designed to disrupt cycles of poverty, unemployment and inequality, especially for young people growing up in disadvantaged communities. At a Safe-Hub, young people can access services, opportunities and support from strong role models through a football-based after-school programme with a focus on health, education and employability. Each Safe-Hub provides a safe place for all young people, including those from minority groups.

Having successfully established three Safe-Hubs in South Africa, reducing crime rates and increasing employability in surrounding communities, AMANDLA is now in the process of setting up its first Safe-Hub in Europe, with its new centre in Berlin due to be completed by 2022. Offering a unique perspective on the question of how football training can be used to develop social competencies and strengthen values for young people, AMANDLA is already organising ‘train the trainer’ workshops for NGOs and football clubs (both amateur and professional). As part of this project, AMANDLA is introducing its EduFootball training curriculum to coaches as a way of fostering social change both on and off the pitch. With more than ten years of experience in youth and community development in South Africa, AMANDLA is currently testing and evaluating its proven concept in order to tailor it to a German/European context. This will allow AMANDLA to ensure the best possible training programme for participants in Berlin once its first centre outside South Africa is operational.

Objectives

  1. Equip German and Austrian coaches to support the development of social competencies through football coaching
  2. Encourage amateur and professional football structures to see value in life skills and integrate them into their football training
  3. Improve the pro-social behaviour of young people participating in EduFootball sessions
  4. Enhance internal knowledge of the project’s methods in order to effectively monitor and evaluate activities

Project activities

  1. ‘Train the trainer’ workshop series
    1. Diversification of current workshop curriculum
    2. 10 one-day workshops with 10 participants each (open to the public)
    3. 10 one-day workshops with 10 participants each (open to partner organisations across Germany and Austria)
    4. Internal workshop aimed at tailoring existing monitoring and evaluation system to planned activities
    5. 10 follow-up site visits at partner organisations
  1. EduFootball training with football clubs
    1. 20 EduFootball ‘train the trainer’ sessions (four workshops – each with five engagement sessions) with up to eight coaches across four/five football clubs
    2. 200 EduFootball training sessions with up to 600 girls and boys
    3. 20 ‘on the job’ supervisory visits to football clubs

Expected results

  1. AMANDLA develops a modular training curriculum that suits various groups of beneficiaries (e.g. both experienced and less experienced coaches)
  2. Coaches across Germany and Austria are better equipped to support the development of social competencies through football coaching
  3. Coaches improve their professional competencies and qualifications in the ‘football for good’ sector
  4. Coaches are better leaders and football coaches and can integrate life skills into training sessions
  5. Coaches significantly improve their ability to support players’ personal development and are more able to resolve conflicts between players
  6. Children have more positive interactions with each other
  7. Children can cope better with conflicts and setbacks
  8. Children have agency and take responsibility for their own actions and lives
  9. Professional football structures see the value of integrating life skills into accredited coaching programmes
  10. The youth development sector has greater awareness of the importance of football as a tool fostering personal development and systemic social change
  11. AMANDLA develops a monitoring and evaluation system to track the implementation of ‘Kick It But Fair’ workshop activities and post-workshop site visits
  12. Staff on the ground have a better understanding of how to monitor workshop activities and post-workshop site visits

Partner

RISE – Beyond goals

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Greece
Start date 01/15/2019
End date -
Cost of the project €246,225
Foundation funding €198,020
Project identifier EUR‐2018738
Partners ActionAid Hellas

Context

The beneficiaries are young people between 12 and 18 years old that live in and around the disadvantaged Kolonos district of Athens. Their families face financial issues and are at risk of social exclusion, with limited opportunities for engaging in athletic activities (lack of motivation or financial resources, gender stereotypes). Some of these young people face high stress, domestic violence, social exclusion and a lack of creative and life-skills education, which leads to fewer opportunities. The challenges they face can lead to depression, aggressive behaviour, misbehaviour, academic failure, inability to interact with other youngsters, a lack of self‐esteem and a lack of guidance. Family ties are often broken and the link to the community can be problematic.

Project content

The RISE project is a youth empowerment through football programme, led by international football player Dimitris Papadopoulos. It provides children with life values and skills, and enables them to have a better life, dignity and opportunities to develop themselves and their communities. Football players are role models for young people and can empower them to fight for a better life. Their role will be crucial in implementing and disseminating the project.

ActionAid is working closely with football clubs, national football associations and the Super League at national level to raise awareness of the methodology and potential of football as a driver for change and development in the communities.

Objectives

  • Empower disadvantaged youth in vulnerable areas by helping them to gain skills, providing access to opportunities and building resilience that will help them improve their quality of life while fighting poverty and social exclusion through football.
  • Support young people, so that they own a community-led programme in all stages, from design to implementation.
  • Help footballers to become agents of change for a society of diversity, mutual respect and solidarity.
  • Empower young members of the football team to become agents of change for a society with diversity, mutual respect and solidarity.
  • Support the multiplication of programme methodology and principles and influence other institutions’ agendas.
  • Empower members of the youth club to develop sustainable valuable life skills.

Project activities

FOOTBALL

Football3 match with famous national football players to ‘lead by example’

Dimitris Papadopoulos and other famous football players (men and women) will demonstrate that, by changing the rules of the game, we can change ourselves and our society for the better.

Football matches with mixed teams

Bring together civil society associations, football clubs and athletics associations to share, play together, discuss and interact by taking part in friendly matches based on Football3, with mixed teams of girls and boys, locally and regionally. The aim is to give children from diverse vulnerabilities – migrants, children living in poverty, girls – the chance to interact.

 

Other football clubs’ matches

Initiate and train football clubs in the region on Football3 methodology to multiply the impact of this programme and raise awareness of the values that children can acquire from football.

 

SKILL DEVELOPMENT

The youth club will be based in the ActionAid Epikentro community centre in the deprived neighbourhood of Kolonos. Children will have the chance to attend the following courses:

Computer classes/digital literacy: A lack of computer skills one aspect of illiteracy. By teaching children how to navigate the internet and use basic computer programs, we help them break down barriers and open doors to new opportunities.

English lessons: English is essential in the global communities. It helps children improve school performance and integrate better into society.

Job orientation: The goal is to help children discover their skills and abilities, set a life plan and goals for themselves.

Psychological support: Children learn to deal with stress and regain self‐respect and self‐ confidence. This is a crucial part of the empowerment process that enables children to engage and commit to all other courses and to football training.

Empowerment/recreational activities: Children are given the opportunity to interact and have fun. Taking part in small festivals, celebrations and entertaining activities is important to engage young people in the community centre.

Expected results

Direct beneficiaries

Football team: 20 young people between 12–18 years old (mixed gender) who are members of the football team

Youth club: 60 young people (mixed gender, social status, national/ethnic origin) actively engaged in youth club activities and in the long term.

Indirect beneficiaries:

80 beneficiaries of other organisations directly engaged in matches (diverse gender, ages, social status, ethnic origin)

40 beneficiaries of national level organisations directly engaged in matches.

Partner

Play for Change sports centre

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Naples, Italy
Start date 01/01/2019
End date 07/31/2020
Cost of the project €123,050
Foundation funding €123,050
Project identifier EUR-2018735
Partners Play for Change

Context

Naples has one of the highest rates of social inequality in Italy. It is also a city where the values of sport are a way of life. Creating a sports centre in Naples for disadvantaged and disabled children is intended to help these youngsters develop while creating new prospects for a better future.

A gym will be renovated in the Sanità district. This neighbourhood is characterised by a very high rate of organised crime, social exclusion and unemployment. La Sanità is not well served by public transport, which contributes to its isolation. There is a lack of educational establishments, with just one primary school and one high school. In the first two years of high school (compulsory education), there is 50% drop-out rate and 74% failure rate. La Sanità is also characterised by a variety of ethnic groups including the Rom, who are the largest community. For these reasons, the project developed by Play for Change aims to rehabilitate young people in this social context through inclusion and participation in sports activities. The Neapolitan name of the project is ‘Juca pe cagna’ (Play for Change).

Project content

Sport is the catalyst for a cultural change and will impart the values of discipline, teamwork, fair play and commitment to children and teenagers, in contrast with the current situation, helping them in the long term to find the motivation to bring about real and sustainable development in the community. The goal is to reduce the school drop-out and failure rates, inspire the youngsters to pursue a career and not be dragged into criminal gangs. Families and community members will encourage the positive change.

Objectives

  • Renovate the gym at La Sanità neighbourhood, turning it into the Play for Change sports centre
  • Propose prevention activities against all forms of generalised malaise among young people
  • Promote healthy lifestyles
  • Provide them with life skills such as knowing how to live together, as well as investing in young people’s cultural development and training
  • Integrate young people into society, helping them to develop employability skills and develop their talents and real abilities
  • Create a platform for activities adapted to the needs of the community and younger people in particular

La Locomotiva Onlus, the project partner, has been working in the Naples district since March 2000, providing educational and training activities in active citizenship, social and employment inclusion, environmental protection and living in peace and without violence, with a focus on community development.

Project activities

The project will last 18 months.

The first nine months will be dedicated to renovating the sport centre, assessing the risks and beneficiaries, as well as meeting local stakeholders.

The second stage will focus on the following:

  1. Organising sports coaching, leadership, and life skills workshops
  2. Social activities, sports activities, educational activities and integration activities for minors
  3. Inclusion and integration activities and support for adults and families
  4. Social, educational and integration activities for the disabled
  5. Cultural activities and events to promote local development
  6. Youth training activities
  7. Activities to promote a network of social policies and develop an educational community

The project is supported by local communities, institutions and sports partners to ensure the sustainability of the project from an economic and social point of view.

Expected results

Direct beneficiaries:

Between 100 and 300 children 3 to 14 years old: 10% migrants or refugees, 50% with challenging social backgrounds, 30% with disabilities, and 10% others.

  • Beneficiaries from extremely difficult backgrounds and families with a variety of issues, such as drug/alcohol abuse or incarceration; youth crime; sexual abuse; teenage pregnancy and teenage parenting; unhealthy nutrition; with limited access to life skills information; no coordinated access to sport.
  • Beneficiaries with vision and hearing disabilities (blind and deaf) and forms of autism

Indirect beneficiaries:

Four schools, two churches, six third-sector associations, 300 families, four sport centres, three institutional entities, and 500 community members.

Partner

Goal Plus

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Switzerland
Start date 12/01/2016
End date 01/31/2020
Cost of the project €200,000
Foundation funding €160,000
Project identifier EUR–2018103
Partners PluSport, Axpo

Context

PluSport is the umbrella organisation for disability sport in Switzerland. The UEFA Foundation for Children has been supporting the Goal Plus project, linked to PluSport’s football section, since 2016. The project aims to use football and the passion it creates to enable all disabled children and teenagers, including those who use wheelchairs, to play football. For these young people, playing football creates new opportunities for social connections, leisure activities, friendships, educational and professional integration, and acceptance in society.

In 2017, the foundation helped to fund the expansion of the Play Football project, which aims to increase the number of disabled children’s teams, as well as the From Football to Rafroball project. Rafroball is a sport for both wheelchair-users and able-bodied players.

In 2018, PluSport set itself the goal of developing and broadening disabled football in order to foster integration and bring through the next generation of young players. This work is constantly evolving. In addition to organised tournaments, new opportunities have been created for disabled children and teenagers to participate in football activities.

PluSport operates in accordance with Swiss Olympic’s Charter of Sports Ethics and recognises the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Project content

For the third consecutive year, the foundation’s support will help to strengthen PluSport’s football-related activities, focusing on two new areas in particular.

  1. Football for the blind and visually impaired: PluSport has decided to support and promote football for the blind and visually impaired, a sport that has been very popular at the Summer Paralympic Games for many years. Unfortunately, Switzerland does not enter a team. Our objective is, therefore, to see a Swiss team participate in the Paralympic Games. This programme will enable many blind and visually impaired youngsters to play football in spite of their visual impairments
  2. Girls’ football: until now, disabled football has mainly involved boys. However, thanks to its success and popularity, this sport is attracting greater interest among girls. PluSport is monitoring this trend, and we would like to help promote girls’ football. To achieve this, we need to work more and more with female experts, instructors and supervisors.

Target groups:

  • disabled and able-bodied children and teenagers throughout the country;
  • girls, in the context of women’s football; and
  • blind and visually impaired children and teenagers, in the context of football for the blind and visually impaired.

Objectives

  • The objectives laid down could be achieved during the course of this year.
    • Continue to facilitate access to ball games for disabled children and teenagers.
    • Create new ball sports teams for children and teenagers.
    • Promote and develop disability sport.
    • Establish new partnerships as part of the project.
    • In collaboration with all football-related associations, ensure that football clubs are open to disabled football and promote inclusion.
    • See a Swiss football team for the blind and visually impaired participate in the Paralympic Games.

Project activities

  • Integration of children and teenagers, individually or in groups, into PluSport clubs.
  • Creation and support of new PluSport football clubs throughout Switzerland.
  • Regular (weekly) training sessions, with supervision and coaching by PluSport.
  • Organised tournaments (five or six per year). The aim is to add two or three tournaments per year in different parts of Switzerland.
  • Football-themed afternoon gatherings for disabled and able-bodied children (schools, vocational schools, institutions).
  • Training sessions for girls are organised in the various regions.
  • Experts are trained and charged with promoting football for the blind and visually impaired throughout Switzerland and coaching the players.
  • Organisation of football camps for children and teenagers.
  • Sourcing of equipment for training sessions and tournaments.

Expected results

  • More PluSport football teams, especially girls’ teams and teams of blind and visually impaired children.
  • Disabled football is promoted through organised gatherings and tournaments for disabled and able-bodied children.
  • Addition of two or three new tournaments.
  • More girls participating in disabled football.
  • New football camps organised for disabled children and teenagers.
  • Expert coaches trained to organise football training sessions for the blind and visually impaired.
  • Creation of a Swiss football team for the blind and visually impaired.

Partner

Come On, Let’s Play

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Ukraine
Start date 04/15/2019
End date 04/30/2020
Cost of the project €84,036
Foundation funding €58,400
Project identifier EUR-2018297
Partners Shakhtar Social

Context

FC Shakhtar Donetsk was based in the town of Donetsk until 2014. Due to the military conflict in the Eastern Ukraine, the club has relocated to Kyiv. Some of Donetsk’s inhabitants have also been forced to move away. According to government data, more than 1.6 million people escaped the conflict region and eight cities near Donetsk, namely: Krasnohorivka, Marinka, Kurakhove, Avdiivka, Shchastya, Popasna, Toretsk and Volnovakha. Some of the children from this region have sustained injuries as a direct result of the military conflict.

Project content

“Come On, Let’s Play!” is a grassroots project which aims to help migrant children from the war zone in Eastern Ukraine, and disadvantaged and disabled children living close to the frontline. Football is a way to instil values, such as respect, integration, responsibility, fun, physical exercise, psychological support and personal development, in these children. The programme includes regular football training sessions for juniors and disabled children, competitions and a final tournament. The possibility of meeting and playing with players from FC Shakhtar’s first team is an additional motivation for these children.

Objectives

In close co-operation with local partners and an international partner – EFDN, the grassroots football project “Come On, Let’s Play!” aims to improve access to football for children living close to the frontline, refugees and socially disadvantaged children.

It seeks to promote social inclusion, improve children’s quality of life, boost extracurricular learning and activities and provide relief from the pressures of living in a crisis area. The main beneficiaries are children aged between 7 and 12, including disabled children. The project aims to attract 620 participants.

Project activities

The first activity is a “Come On, Let’s Play!” grassroots football project for children aged between 7 and 12, with the aim of improving the social inclusion of children living close to the frontline.

It will be a 12-month programme comprising the following elements.

  • Free football sessions held three times a week by the main coach and two volunteers.
  • The main coach and volunteers train 60 children per playground (with the exception of Toretsk – 80 participants) in two different age groups (U10 and U12), with at least 10% of participants being girls.
  • Four groups of disabled children will be trained in four project locations, involving 40 children.
  • The disabled children will have an adapted programme and will be provided with the necessary equipment.
  • During the implementation of the project, FC Shakhtar first team players will visit each project location and play a football game with the children.
  • The Saturday football session will include football matches between different age groups.
  • The children will be provided with all the necessary equipment: training kits, balls, flat disks, bibs, a whistle, football nets, first aid kits, pumps, freeze sprays and coordination ladders.

 

The second activity is the “Come On, Let’s Play!” competition (one day). Twice a year, a local “Come On, Let’s Play!” competition will be held at each playground, in autumn 2019 and spring 2020. These competitions aim to enhance the children’s enjoyment, promoting a healthy lifestyle and allowing them to meet other children in locations close to the frontline. The participants of the “Come On, Let’s Play!” competition are organised into U10 and U12 teams. The expected number of participants is 480, with a minimum of 10% being girls.

 

The third activity is the “Come On, Let’s play!” final tournament in Volnovakha (two days). The “Come On, Let’s Play!” final tournament aims to unite all participants from the locations close to the frontline and promote social inclusion. It will take place in Volnovakha in April 2020. The final tournament will feature four U10 teams and four U12 teams from the eight different towns located close to the frontline. The total number of participants is 80 children aged between 7 and 12, with at least one girl per team. There will be 30 support staff (coaches and parents). Each town is allowed to put forward just one team of ten participants in one of the two age categories (U10 or U12). The tournament participants will be provided with accommodation, food and refreshments.

Expected results

  • 620 children aged between 7 and 12 are expected to benefit from the “Come On, Let’s Play” programme.
  • Regular football training sessions will take place three times a week in two age categories (U10 and U12).
  • Two local tournaments will be held in autumn 2019 and spring 2020 involving 480 participants.
  • One final tournament will be held in Volnovakha in April 2020 involving one team from each of the eight cities.

Partner