Learning to change

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Ghana
Start date 03/01/2022
End date 02/28/2023
Cost of the project 57,149€
Foundation funding 18,387€
Project identifier 20211184
Partners Play Soccer Ghana
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Employability - Gender Equality - Personal development

Context

The education system in Ghana is mainly theory, with little attention paid to practice. Many pupils are therefore unable to develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

Project content

This programme harnesses the unique appeal of football for community development by creating learning opportunities for children between the ages of 5 and 15 to improve their life skills, health and playing ability. Besides applying the football3 philosophy, the programme collects used plastic bags that are knitted into goal nets. The project will be run in 11 satellite communities in six regions for 12 months, reaching a total of 880 beneficiaries.

Objectives

Children will gain additional learning opportunities through ‘play for fun’ and ‘learn for life’ (PFFLFL) sessions to learn more about good health, develop life skills and apply the knowledge they acquire to real-world problem-solving.

The children will sort plastic bags used in their homes and schools which will then be knitted into goal nets.

The football3 philosophy will be used to teach fair play, equality and participation of girls in soccer.

Project activities

  • Coaches will be trained to use the PFFLFL curriculum to educate the children in life skills, health and football;
  • Beneficiaries will take part in weekly PFFLFL sessions;
  • Youngsters will be trained how to re-use plastic bags to produce goal nets and promote clean cities;
  • football3 matches will teach children about fair play and avoiding discrimination.

Expected results

  • 33 coaches will learn how to use football activities to promote learning;
  • 880 children in six regions throughout Ghana will benefit from PFFLFL activity sessions to improve their life skills, health and football;
  • 200 households will sort their plastic waste and plastic bags will be knitted into goal nets;
  • football3 matches will teach children about the need for inclusion, fair play and gender equality.

Partner

Football United Myanmar

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Myanmar
Start date 02/01/2022
End date 12/31/2022
Cost of the project 75,000€
Foundation funding 65,000€
Project identifier 20210751
Partners Football United (University of New South Wales)
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Conflict victims

Context

Football United (FU) brought the sport for development and peace (S4DP) concept and practice to Myanmar in 2013 and has since then worked with various in-country partners across the country, introducing S4DP in four thematic areas: football for youth leadership and life skills development; social cohesion; resilience building; and psychological support.

The violent crackdown following the coup in 2021 caused people to flee to areas controlled by armed ethnic organisations. Kayin is one of the few states where people have been able to seek refuge, with many living in refugee camps on the Thai-Burmese border. Social, emotional, and basic needs are critical. Operating in the state since 2016, Football United provides staff and logistics to address many of these needs.

Project content

FU has developed special learning materials to help young people and communities to build up resilience, life skills and psychological support through specially designed football activities.

Objectives

  • Engage the conflict-affected communities in specially designed playing opportunities and football-based behaviour-change mechanisms to improve resilience and reduce vulnerability;
  • Build capacity and a flow-on effect in the broader conflict-affected communities, enabling them to recover from trauma and other stresses and faster develop more sustainable solutions to crises.

Project activities

  • Situation analysis: roles, contributions of key stakeholders; sites in addition to the FU Peace Centre; SWOT;
  • Develop tailor-made curriculums including virtual delivery mechanisms;
  • Staff/volunteer induction course delivered either face-to-face or online depending on circumstances;
  • Weekly football-based resilience activities;
  • Fair play tournaments delivered quarterly, conditions permitting;
  • Training of trainers: community members trained to develop future programmes.

Expected results

  • Kayin state has more safe spaces for community members to play and heal;
  • Participating youngsters and coaches experienced an increased sense of hope and healing, through positive changes in attitudes, beliefs, community solidarity actions. Quantitative result: at least 50% improvement compared to baseline figures;
  • Mechanisms introduced for mutual support and continuing engagement of partners: Red Cross branch leaders, IDP camp and conflict-affected non-IDP community leaders to further develop football-based psychological support and resilience-building in their communities.

Partner

Safer Play – Safeguarding in Sport for Development

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Worlwide
Start date 03/01/2022
End date 05/31/2023
Cost of the project 140,044€
Foundation funding 140,044€
Project identifier 20210464
Partners Streetfootballworld
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Conflict victims - Gender Equality

Context

Throughout the world, more and more organisations are using sport as an effective development tool to meet targets related to education, social inclusion, child protection and empowerment. However, it must be accompanied by high-quality safeguarding training and robust safeguarding practices at all levels.

In 2021, the UEFA Foundation for Children and streetfootballworld took the lead in the sport-for-good sector by launching an online safeguarding course. A five-track training programme was developed in collaboration with experts to educate, support and raise the awareness of coaches, volunteers and everyone working in the sport-for-good sector.

Project content

In 2022, the online training programme will be refined and adjusted to the specific needs of those working with at-risk children and adults. All the content will be made available to all sport-for-good organisations worldwide with the aim of nurturing a global culture of mutual support in the safeguarding sector. The ‘do no harm’ principle will be at the core of each sports-based activity and regional, contextual and cultural specificities will be taken into account.

Objectives

The overall goal is to minimise intentional and unintentional harm to vulnerable groups, especially children, in sport-for-good contexts. This will be achieved by building on UEFA’s previous safeguarding initiatives to develop a certification course for all practitioners working with children and at-risk youth and with adults within the sport-for-good sector. The knowledge and training track will benefit from local expertise by engaging sport-for-good organisations working closely with children in their communities.

Project activities

  • Refining and scaling up the existing sport-for-good safeguarding certification course to reach new organisations with the aim of obtaining feedback and making further improvements and thematic additions;
  • Boosting organisational capacity by developing tools and providing workshops on organisational safeguarding structures.

Expected results

  • 150,000 at-risk youngsters will be reached indirectly by the ten organisations that complete the online certification programme and attend the organisational safeguarding workshops;
  • 150 new coaches and other sport-for-good practitioners, including youth leaders and counsellors, from ten new organisations will complete the online certification programme and take part in the workshops, gaining a qualification in safeguarding and building knowledge and skills relating to child protection;
  • The updated course will be disseminated to all of the 154 organisations in the streetfootballworld network, indirectly benefiting a total of 1.3 million at-risk youngsters.

Partner

Football for children with Down syndrome

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Russia
Start date 02/01/2022
End date 01/31/2023
Cost of the project 114,497€
Foundation funding 28,046€
Project identifier 20210323
Partners Syndrome of Love
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities

Context

In Russia, people with Down syndrome still face many barriers to their integration into society. It is widely recognised that sport assists social integration because it develops physical and mental abilities and improves emotional and psychological well-being. However, there are still not enough classes, clubs, coaches, methods or facilities to enable children with intellectual disabilities in Russia to participate in sports.

Project content

This project is a continuation of the 2021 project supported by the UEFA Foundation for Children. Regular football training sessions are planned for 200 children and teenagers with Down syndrome aged 7 to 18, as well as a training camp and the third interregional football competition. The Syndrome of Love foundation plans to help four regional non-profit organisations set up football training groups for children with Down syndrome. One of the long-term objectives is to set up a national football team for people with Down syndrome to compete internationally.

Objectives

  • Involve children and teenagers with Down syndrome in regular football training in five regions of Russia (including Moscow);
  • Help four regional non-profits set up football training for children with Down syndrome;
  • Improve the skills and qualifications of coaches and physical education teachers working with children with Down syndrome;
  • Demonstrate the ability of people with Down syndrome to participate in sports by creating a friendly and tolerant environment where equal rights and opportunities are supported;
  • Inform parents, coaches and university students about the importance of sports activities for children and teenagers with Down syndrome.

Project activities

  • Regular football training sessions for children and teenagers with Down syndrome;
  • Competitive selection of non-profits to receive funding to set up football training groups for children with Down syndrome;
  • Skills improvement course for coaches in adaptive physical education and organising mini-football training for children with Down syndrome;
  • Seminar for more experienced coaches;
  • Training camp for children with Down syndrome based at a sports camp in the Moscow region;
  • Third interregional football competition for children and teenagers with Down syndrome;
  • Information campaign on developing opportunities in sports for people with Down syndrome;
  • Information campaign for parents to involve as many girls as possible in sports.

Expected results

  • Six football groups for children with Down syndrome in Moscow and the other regions;
  • 200 children regularly playing football in groups;
  • 26–50% of participants involved in the project are girls;
  • 600 football training sessions for children with Down syndrome;
  • 10 coaches completed the skills improvement course;
  • 200 participants (including children, accompanying persons, coaches and organisers) in the third interregional football competition for children and teenagers with Down syndrome;
  • 200 participants in the training camp (including children, accompanying persons, coaches and organisers);
  • 1,000,000 people reached by the information campaign.

Partner

Generation Sport 2022

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Armenia
Start date 01/01/2022
End date 12/31/2022
Cost of the project 64,086€
Foundation funding 55,162€
Project identifier 20210723
Partners Armenian Fund for Sustainable Development
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Conflict victims - Infrastructure and equipment - Personal development

Context

This project is a follow-up to Generation Sport in 2021, which was a huge success throughout the country. In August 2021, Armenia had 1,403 schools with 368,184 pupils: 175,359 girls and 192,825 boys.

The lack of suitable equipment and the bad state of repair of the sports facilities hamper the PE classes that the children enjoy so much.

The armed conflict in 2020 took its toll on the children, who now need positive, fun experiences.

Project content

The project will promote sport among young people and encourage physical eduction throughout the country. Twenty-five schools will be selected to receive sports equipment. Events will be organised to promote sport and exercise among the school-age population. Organised meet-and-greets with sports personalities will motivate the youngsters and encourage them to fulfil their potential. The project will help promote the inclusion of disabled children in sporting activities.

Objectives

Overall objective: Promote sport and exercise among young people

Specific objective: Motivate the children and help them to fulfil their potential through the following activities:

  • Providing sports equipment for 25 schools, prioritising schools in remote regions and those with disabled pupils
  • Promoting the inclusion of disabled children through sport
  • Involving the ministry of education, science, culture and sport in organising sports competitions
  • Organising sports events

Project activities

Applications and selection

  • Launch, jury, school selection
  • Equipment purchases
  • Distribution to schools

Sports events

  • Meet-and-greets with sports celebrities
  • Promote the inclusion of disabled children
  • Sports events in schools

National school football competition

  • Promote sport
  • Award prizes

Expected results

  • At least 150 schools (over 40,000 pupils) apply for sports equipment
  • 25 schools (over 7,500 pupils) receive equipment
  • At least 10 motivational meet-and-greets, involving 1,000 youngsters
  • At least 4 sporting inclusion events, involving 200 youngsters
  • 300 brochures on the importance of sport distributed
  • 300 sports awareness posters distributed to schools

Partner

Bijzondere Eredivisie

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location The Netherlands
Start date 03/01/2022
End date 06/30/2023
Cost of the project 175,000€
Foundation funding 75,000€
Project identifier 20210337
Partners Stichting Het Gehandicapte Kind
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Personal development

Context

There are currently about 1,500 children practising disabled football in the Netherlands. Just like children without disabilities, they dream of playing for their favourite professional football club. Thanks to the Bijzondere Eredivisie, this dream can become a reality! Children with a disability are placed in the spotlight and everyone can see that it is also possible for every child to play at the highest level. We hope to inspire more children with disabilities to also play football and other sports.

Project content

The Bijzondere Eredivisie is a competition for professional football clubs who participate with their own team of disabled children. Launched in September 2019, this is the first competition in the world in which children with disabilities play for their favourite professional football club. The teams consist of 12 boys and girls of different ages and various disabilities. The teams are carefully selected, according to criteria that ensure a balanced competition.

Objectives

  • Increase the visibility of children with disabilities
  • Inspire disabled children to believe that anything is possible
  • Increase sports participation of disabled children
  • Increase awareness of disabled football in the Netherlands
  • Establish a sustainable competition, including all professional Dutch football clubs.

Project activities

  • Clubs 'scout' their own team
  • 12 clubs and 144 children take part in the competition
  • Teams train once a week at the professional club’s training ground
  • Clubs organise all kind of events for their disabled teams
  • Organisation of the competition (including transport)
  • Competition matches are held twice a month, and every professional football club hosts once per season
  • Activities are communicated on social media platforms: the teams’ own channels and those of the football clubs

Expected results

  • Children socialise and make new friends through their football clubs; especially during the pandemic it is very important for these children to have enough social interaction
  • Notable improvement in terms of the confidence and health of the disabled children
  • The players act as a catalyst for a more positive, inclusive perception of disabled children
  • More disabled children start to play football
  • Minimum of 18 professional clubs are involved in the competition within three years
  • Clubs are 50% self-financing

Partner

Live together II

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Turkey and Syria
Start date 01/01/2022
End date 10/30/2022
Cost of the project 200,000€
Foundation funding 200,000€
Project identifier 20210900
Partners Bonyan Organization for Youth and Development
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Conflict victims - Gender Equality - Infrastructure and equipment - Personal development

Context

The Syrian refugee crisis remains the largest humanitarian and development crisis in the world. Across the five main Syrian-refugee hosting countries, over 10 million people need some form of humanitarian and resilience support, the highest number in nearly a decade. This includes 5.5 million Syrian refugees and 4.8 million impacted host community members.

The key underlying issues are large-scale protracted displacement, socio-economic conditions, COVID-19 and demographic pressures. Turkey currently hosts approximately 3.6 million refugees, the majority of whom live out-of-camp, integrated into host (Turkish) communities in cities and villages. Both communities therefore share the same environment and resources.

Project content

The Live Together II project is a continuation of the 2019 Live Together project. Work will be done in schools to disseminate and mainstream football3 culture among teachers, who in turn will pass it on to the children. Capacity-building courses will be held, playgrounds rehabilitated and brochures, guidebooks and sports supplies distributed.

Children with special needs will also be included in the sports activities. Girls’ and boys’ football teams will be set up to involve girls in sports activities, with the hope that this will lead to wider inclusion of girls within the community. The project volunteers will receive training on child protection principles, awareness of child protection issues, the promotion of children’s rights and health tips to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Objectives

The project’s overall goal is to use football as a tool for building peaceful coexistence, as well as to improve the sports infrastructure in schools in the border towns of Akçakale in Turkey and Tal Abyad in Syria.

Project activities

  • Playground rehabilitation: Playgrounds in five schools – in each country - will be rehabilitated so that children attending and living near the school can play sports, which will improve their life skills and promote peaceful coexistence.
  • Teacher capacity-building: The teacher training programme will last four days and focus on mainstreaming the football3 methodology as well as other social cohesion activities that can be integrated into classwork.
  • Capacity-building for youth mediators: Youth mediators will volunteer as coaches in the football3 leagues. They will prepare and facilitate the football3 sessions, mediate any conflicts arising between the teams and act as positive role models for the children.
  • Running football3 leagues: Football3 leagues will be set up: one in Turkey and one in Syria. All teams will include both Turkish and Syrian children. Children will play in a safe environment where they will have fun, learn life skills and build their resilience. The volunteer coaches will discuss well-being with the children to provide them with psychosocial support.

Expected results

  • Playgrounds will be rehabilitated in five schools in Turkey and Syria.
  • 100 teachers will be provided with training on football3 and sports for children.
  • 240 children will take part in football3 games in Turkey and Syria.
  • 80 young people will play an active role in their communities and receive training on football3 methodology, leadership and conflict resolution.

Partner

BRACE

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Beirut, Lebanon
Start date 02/01/2022
End date 01/31/2023
Cost of the project 183,000€
Foundation funding 150,000€
Project identifier 20210392
Partners INTERSOS
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Personal development

Context

The current deterioration of the economic crisis in Lebanon puts children and teenagers at greater risk of abuse, violence and exploitation. According to the recently published emergency response plan, there is a growing need for protection among Lebanese and migrant children. This creates risks of social tensions among different communities based on their perceptions of access to available services. The child protection sector in Lebanon reports an increased need for psychosocial support services. Additionally, there are growing numbers of children engaged in child labour. Due to the closure of schools due to COVID-19 and the deterioration of the economic crisis, many children in Syrian refugee communities, but also Lebanese and other migrants, are engaged in child labour to support their families. One of the ways humanitarian actors can meet the increasing needs for protection services, including psychosocial support, is by providing safe spaces for children, where they can take part in sports and recreational activities run by child-protection specialists.

Project content

The project BRACE, Beirut Rehabilitation of Recreational Areas for Children and Equality, aims to enhance protection and social cohesion in vulnerable areas of Mount Lebanon governorate, by providing access to a safe and secure playing field for children, where they can have fun, engage in sports activities and interact with members of different communities (refugee, migrant, host). It will be run in partnership with the local municipality and a community-based organisation to ensure its sustainability beyond the project period.

Main communication message - the well-being of vulnerable children can also be protected through access to sport.

Objectives

The overall project objective is to enhance child protection and social cohesion in vulnerable areas of Mount Lebanon governorate in Lebanon.

  • Provide a safe space where children can play and engage in sports and other recreational activities;
  • Help a community-based organisation run sports and recreational activities for children and teenagers.

Project activities

Rehabilitation of an existing playing field

  • Painting, installing walls and roofing;
  • Installing artificial grass, football goals and basketball hoops;
  • Lighting with solar panels to ensure safety and sustainability despite the worsening energy crisis;
  • -Rehabilitating WASH facilities.

Support for a community-based organisation providing

  • Sports, arts, psychosocial activities;
  • Solidarity initiatives for migrants, refugees, host-community children.

Expected results

  • A playing field in Mount Lebanon governorate is rehabilitated and upgraded, providing a safe recreational space for all communities, especially children and teenagers;
  • 200 children and teenagers are engaged in sports and art activities by the local community-based organisation supporting social inclusion and well-being at community level;
  • A community-based organisation is supported and able to provide regular sports and recreational activities for children from different communities.

Partner

Football for peace

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Colombia
Start date 02/01/2022
End date 01/31/2023
Cost of the project 88,000€
Foundation funding 78,000€
Project identifier 20211084
Partners Ankla Foundation
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Personal development

Context

Colombia has suffered internal war for more than 50 years. As many as 260,000 people have lost their lives and 7 million citizens have been displaced as internal refugees. After the peace agreement with the FARC guerrilla in 2016, people have returned to their homes. Ex-guerrilla combatants are now in reincorporation spaces, but relations with the local population are difficult. This project uses football as a tool to achieve reconciliation and peace between both groups, focusing on the children.

Project content

The project supports the peace process in Colombia by promoting human rights, coexistence and inclusion among ex-FARC combatants and the local community, while also preventing new violence, through football training and psychosocial interventions with the children. It will run for one year in four territorial spaces for training and reincorporation (TSTR: land given by the government to ex-combatants to help them reintegrate into society), benefiting 615 children of ex-combatants.

Objectives

  • Promote healthy coexistence among ex-combatants and the community using football as a tool for social integration and to prevent the resurgence of violence.
  • Promote the search for talent among the children of ex-combatants to encourage development through self-realization.
  • Provide psychosocial support for the children of ex-combatants, their families and the community, in order to restore their rights, emotional integrity, and productive reintegration into civil and family life.

Project activities

  • Collecting baseline socio-economic information
  • Training and participation in local leagues (10 football training sessions per week in each TSTR)
  • Psychosocial interventions with children and their families (eight psychosocial workshops per week in each TSTR)
  • Meetings between the community and TSTR leaders
  • Competitions and participation in various leagues

 

Expected results

  • The majority of children from the TSTRs attend the training sessions and psychosocial workshops (75%).
  • Civil society that lives around these TSTRs will accept the presence of ex-combatants in their community and are in favour of their reintegration into society (70%).
  • Improved gender equality inside football groups (30% girls at least).
  • Improvements among the children and teenagers diagnosed with various psychosocial issues over the course of 12 months (50% children with psychosocial problems due mostly to the civil war experience an improvement).
  • Through football, the children develop as persons, learn about rules and are kept away from criminal activities; coaches act as mentors. Training is a way to reach the children and their families for psychosocial interventions.

Partner

Improving the Psychosocial Wellbeing of Conflict-Affected Displaced Children

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Cabo Delgado, Mozambique
Start date 02/01/2021
End date 11/30/2021
Cost of the project 45,884€
Foundation funding 43,884€
Project identifier 20201286
Partners Street Child
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Conflict victims - Personal development

Context

Northern Mozambique has suffered from conflict and insecurity since 2017. Deterioration in the security situation and an increase in attacks has coincided with several emergencies: cyclone Kenneth in 2019, severe flooding in early 2020 and the emergence of COVID-19 in March 2020. Currently, 335,000 people have been displaced by insecurity, with children making up 50%. During this time, children have suffered from a sustained loss of education and exposure to traumatic situations.

Project content

Sport will be used to address the psychosocial needs of children affected by conflict and emergencies, while helping displaced children integrate into their host communities. Street Child will help schools to understand the needs of pupils and facilitate support sessions for them as they return to school post displacement and COVID-19. Community sessions will also be delivered by trained facilitators to out-of-school children.

Objectives

  • Address the psychosocial needs of children who have been affected by conflict, displacement and emergency situations
  • Support retention of children in school through the provision of support services
  • Promote integration between displaced and host communities
  • Promote children’s rights and strengthen protection mechanisms in the wider community

Project activities

  • Delivery of psychosocial support sessions to in-school and out-of-school children, using recreational activities, including sport, to help them deal with trauma and build life skills
  • Providing training workshops for psychosocial support facilitators in the use of play-based activities as a tool for integration and development
  • Providing teacher and school council workshops on the delivery of psychosocial support in schools and creating inclusive environments
  • Holding community awareness-raising campaigns on children’s rights and protection services

Expected results

  • 6,000 children (3,000 girls and 3,000 boys) will receive psychosocial support and integration support through in-school and community-based activities
  • 90 school educational staff will receive training in psychosocial support to promote inclusive environments for all pupils
  • 12 local community facilitators will receive training on the delivery of play-based psychosocial support interventions
  • 6 communities will receive awareness-raising on children’s rights and child protection services

Partner

Child Safeguarding Certification Programme for Sport-for-Good Practitioners

Location and general information

Terminé
Location Europe
Start date 03/31/2021
End date 03/31/2022
Cost of the project 207,130€
Foundation funding 207,130€
Project identifier 20200898
Partners Streetfootballworld
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Employability - Personal development

Context

Sport-for-good (SFG) practitioners work with children on a daily basis. However, according to a streetfootballworld network assessment, only 50% have a basic or intermediate knowledge of safeguarding and only 45% have a basic or intermediate understanding of children’s rights and the rights of child athletes. 85% want to receive proper safeguarding training and with 80,000+ adults working with vulnerable groups in the SFG sector, the need for training on this topic is evident.

Project content

The UEFA Foundation for Children and streetfootballworld (sfw) will take the lead in the sector by launching a safeguarding certification and capacity-building programme to ensure children’s fundamental rights across the world are safeguarded. The programme will benefit from regional, contextual, and cultural expertise by engaging five football-for-good (FFG) organisations working closely with children in their communities. Ultimately, the online safeguarding certification programme will be made available, through the UEFA Foundation for Children, to all SFG practitioners around the world.

Objectives

The overall goal of this programme is to minimise intentional and unintentional harm to vulnerable groups. UEFA’s previous safeguarding efforts will be used to develop a certification course for all practitioners working with children and at-risk youth and adults within the sport-for-good sector.

Project activities

  • Implementing an online knowledge/training certification programme for FFG/SFG organisations.
  • Identifying and working with five organisations (diversified globally and UEFA Foundation 2020 grant awardees) to co-create content and review it contextually and culturally.
  • Training 75 staff members (15 per organisation) with the course.
  • Involving 150 local parents in assessment of the contents.
  • Together with the UEFA Foundation for Children, engaging in advocacy for sector-wide policy on training/certification of FFG practitioners.

Expected results

  • One online course on safeguarding for SFG practitioners.
  • 75 coaches and staff members from the five FFG/SFG organisations will gain a qualification in safeguarding in the SFG sector and build knowledge and skills regarding protecting children and at-risk youth.
  • 150 parents will provide feedback to ensure local receptivity to the content.
  • Evidence will be collected from the pilot programme to reflect, adjust, and advocate for a standardised approach at a policy level.

Partner

Promoting inclusion through sport for street children in Pointe-Noire

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Republic of Congo, Pointe-Noire
Start date 01/01/2021
End date 12/31/2022
Cost of the project 792,382€
Foundation funding 150,000€
Project identifier 20200759
Partners Samusocial International
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Personal development

Context

The number of street children in the Republic of Congo is increasing. Homeless, without family for support and stigmatised by others, they are socially excluded and do not have access to basic health and social services. The health, economic and social crisis caused by the global pandemic has had a very significant impact on street children. It has reinforced their situation of extreme vulnerability and made it even harder for them to survive on the streets, as they face more stigmatisation and more violence and it is more difficult to access care. The structures that support street children have also been strongly affected by the health crisis.

Created in 2006 with the support of Samusocial International, Samusocial Pointe-Noire assists street children, offering them holistic care. It has developed various services, including mobile teams who carry out street rounds, an emergency shelter and a day-care centre. Samusocial Pointe-Noire also works with partners to build and strengthen a continuum of care, including assistance for street children and young people in their plans to leave the street.

 

Project content

Samusocial Pointe-Noire aims to strengthen its approach to care by using sport as a means of social integration, enabling children and young people who are lost in life on the streets to find direction. The organisation’s approach consists of medical and psychosocial care reinforced by the practice of sport, helping children to develop the personal and social skills necessary for social integration.

Objectives

The overall objective is to contribute to the social inclusion of street children in Pointe-Noire.

The specific objectives are to ensure street children’s access to medical and psychosocial care and to promote their re-socialisation through the practice of sport.

Project activities

  • Carrying out street rounds to provide medical and psychosocial care to street children.
  • Providing accommodation for street children and supporting them in their plans to leave the streets.
  • Creating a football field at Samusocial Pointe-Noire’s shelter.
  • Organising monthly training sessions and annual competitions for street football and Nzango, a popular local sport.
  • Training sports facilitators.
  • Raising awareness of the problems that street children face.
  • Participating in a consultation taking place between NGOs and public bodies for the promotion of street children’s rights.

Expected results

  • 600 street children per year have access to medical and social assistance, through 300 street rounds.
  • 200 street children per year are accommodated at the shelter.
  • 60 street children per year are supported in leaving the streets.
  • 1 football field is created.
  • 60 street children, including 20 girls, participate in sports activities.
  • 12 street football and Nzango training sessions are carried out per month.
  • 2 street football and Nzango sports competitions are held.
  • 8 sports facilitators are trained.
  • 400 people and 15 professionals are made more aware of the problems that street children face.

Partner

Playing for Equality: Making Equality a Reality

Location and general information

Terminé
Location Cambodia, Phnom Penh
Start date 01/01/2021
End date 03/31/2022
Cost of the project 23,450€
Foundation funding 23,000€
Project identifier 20201165
Partners Indochina Starfish Foundation (ISF)
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Gender Equality - Personal development

Context

As Cambodia continues to recover from the impact of the Khmer Rouge’s destructive regime, corruption and inequality remain prevalent. 44% of children in Cambodia live in multidimensional poverty, experiencing barriers to childhood development such as malnutrition and poor sanitation. As a result, access to education and organised sports in disadvantaged communities is limited. This is especially the case for vulnerable groups such as girls and disabled children, who experience pervasive discrimination that often prohibits them from accessing their right to attend school and practice sports in safe environments. ISF Cambodia believes every child has the right to education, healthcare and play.

Project content

To challenge discrimination and promote the inclusion of minorities in sport, ISF Cambodia will partner with 15 schools and NGOs to provide football-for-good lessons to 300 children, including deaf and HIV-positive players. ISF’s experienced coaches will deliver ISF’s social outreach curriculum by using football-based activities to educate young players on gender equality, disability rights, and children’s rights. The project will culminate in a football festival that celebrates diversity and inclusion in sport.

Objectives

  • Increase youth access to sport across all genders and abilities.
  • Improve attitudes towards equal societies and inclusion in sport.
  • Provide a safe space for young people to explore social issues such as children’s rights, gender equality, disability and inclusion.
  • Empower girls and people with disabilities and HIV.

Project activities

  • Training ISF’s experienced coaches in ISF’s adapted social outreach curriculum, covering gender equality, disability rights, and children’s rights.
  • Delivering three sessions to 15 groups of 20 players – one group from each of the nine schools and six NGOs ISF will partner with.
  • Assessing changes in knowledge and attitude using comprehensive monitoring and evaluation tools.
  • Hosting a fun and celebratory football festival for all 300 players.

Expected results

  • 15 coaches will increase their capacity to deliver football-for-good sessions to players with a range of abilities.
  • 300 players will have greater access to organised sport activities.
  • 300 players will have a better understanding of minority rights and improved attitudes towards the inclusion of minorities in society and in sport.

Partner

Generation Sport 2021

Location and general information

Terminé
Location Armenia
Start date 04/01/2021
End date 12/31/2021
Cost of the project 63,959€
Foundation funding 55,052€
Project identifier 20200519
Partners Armenian Fund for Sustainable Development
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Infrastructure and equipment - Personal development

Context

Physical education is compulsory for all schoolchildren in Armenia and one of their favourites. However, a lack of equipment and the poor condition of sports facilities in schools make it difficult for lessons to take place properly.

Regularly practising sport helps young people learn values such as respect, team spirit, regular attendance, politeness and personal investment, which are all essential for social and professional integration.

The Armenian Fund for Sustainable Development has always been closely involved in education. Its Generation Sport 2021 project follows on from Generation Sport 2020, which was extremely successful nationwide and resulted in 16 schools receiving sports equipment.

Project content

Schools will be invited to create a short video about the school, school life, the pupils’ motivation for applying and their sporting achievements, as well as their involvement in the community and in protecting the environment. The Armenian Fund for Sustainable Development and the Armenian Ministry of Education, Science, Culture and Sport will select 25 schools to receive sports equipment.

The Armenian Fund for Sustainable Development will organise several events to encourage young people to take part in sports, including visits by sports personalities to motivate them to reach their full potential. A sports competition for schoolchildren will also be held in partnership with the Ministry of Education, Science, Culture and Sport.

Objectives

  • Encourage young people to practise sport and fulfil their potential.
  • Promote inclusion of pupils with disabilities through sports.

Project activities

  • Purchasing and distributing sports equipment to 25 schools, with priority given to schools in remote areas and with disabled pupils.
  • Supporting the Ministry of Education, Science, Culture and Sports in the organisation of a national sports competition.
  • Organising sports events at schools, including visits from sports personalities.

Expected results

  • 368,968 children in 1,403 schools will be informed and educated about sport.
  • At least 100 schools (with over 35,000 pupils) will take part in the competition to receive sports equipment.
  • 25 schools will receive sports equipment, benefiting at least 7,500 children.
  • At least 10 motivational visits will take place for the benefit of 1,000 children.
  • At least four inclusion through sport events will take place for 200 children.
  • 300 brochures about the importance of sport will be distributed to children.
  • 300 sports awareness posters will be displayed in schools.

Partner

Sports for Resilience and Empowerment Project (SREP)

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location Uganda , Kampala
Start date 03/01/2021
End date 03/01/2022
Cost of the project 193,215€
Foundation funding 144,911€
Project identifier 20200410
Partners Aliguma Foundation
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Conflict victims - Gender Equality - Infrastructure and equipment - Personal development

Context

Children make up 60% of the Ugandan population, and 55% of them are experiencing child poverty. Of the 270 million people in Africa living in slums, 2.4 million are in Uganda and 60% of them reside in Kampala. Acholi Quarters is one of the biggest slums in Kampala and is home to over 20,000 people. Children living in slums face deprivation, exclusion, vulnerability and lifelong difficulties linked to limited physical, psychological and intellectual development. They are exposed to violence, exploitation, abuse, neglect, child labour, trafficking, sexual exploitation and child marriage.

Project content

The Sports for Resilience and Empowerment Project (SREP) aims to transform the vulnerable Acholi Quarters community through sports and was a result of consultations between the Aliguma Foundation, the children’s families and caregivers and community leaders. The project targets girls, boys, women and other caregivers (including refugees and those with disabilities) living in Acholi Quarters. A sports facility equipped with basic training facilities will enable 850 women and other caregivers to gain skills to start and manage their own businesses, allowing them to take care of themselves and their families sustainably. The goal is to protect over 2,500 children from exploitation and enable them to go to school and delay marriage until the right time.

Objectives

  • Develop a sports training facility to develop the talent of children in Acholi Quarters slums.
  • Use sport and trade skills to empower 2,500 children and 850 caregivers to escape social and economic exclusion by 2021.
  • Improve the capacity of 200 trainers and coaches to manage and improve the talent and social behaviour of the children.
  • Create access to social and economic opportunities for women and their children.
  • Raise awareness about child protection and gender equality.

Project activities

  • Training and mentoring community-based volunteers, informal community trainers and coaches, linking them to schools and churches in the community and establishing a ‘children- to-coaches’ support network.
  • Community sports activities and events involving all demographics of the community for social, health and wellness as well as talent development purposes.
  • Installing and erecting goal posts and nets, fencing the sports facility, building toilets and changing rooms, and procuring balls and other training equipment.
  • Training caregivers in practical skills such as shoe making, jewellery, tailoring, fashion and design, cookery, house-keeping, child care, nutrition, phone repair, computer literacy, finance, business plans and business development.
  • Drafting user manuals, best practice briefs and articles and conducting research studies and project evaluation.

Expected results

  • A sports facility in Acholi Quarters equipped with decent basic training facilities, toilets and changing rooms.
  • 200 trainers and coaches able to manage the holistic development of children.
  • At least 700 women and other caregivers possessing skills needed to start and manage their own businesses and take care of themselves and their families.
  • 2,500 children aged 6–17 (1,800 girls and 700 boys) protected from exploitation and able to go to school and delay marriage.
  • Gender equality in Acholi Quarters promoted and improved through equal opportunities.

Partner

We are the Champions

Location and general information

Ongoing
Location South-Sudan
Start date 01/01/2021
End date 12/31/2023
Cost of the project 180,166€
Foundation funding 103,200€
Project identifier 20200429
Partners Light for the World International
Categories Access to Sport - Children with disabilities - Conflict victims

Context

Over 1.87 million South Sudanese people have been internally displaced by the conflicts that erupted in December 2013 and July 2016. In the aftermath of the December 2013 to April 2014 conflict, Light for the World carried out an informal random appraisal of the accessibility of the humanitarian services provided by various agencies in the Mahad and Gumbo Internally Displaced People (IDP) camps and host communities. It primarily assessed the education and rehabilitation services for children and adults with disabilities; the general physical accessibility of the camps; and the knowledge, attitude and practices of the humanitarian assistance staff in relation to disabilities. It was found that the knowledge, competencies, vulnerability and needs of persons with disabilities, especially children, girls and women, were being ignored.

Project content

The project’s main goal is to use sports to promote the rights of children with disabilities to access basic health, rehabilitation, education and other services in schools, IDP camps and host community settings.

Sports will further uplift spirits, promote inter-ethnic togetherness, raise disability awareness, and enhance social-cultural and economic inclusion and participation leading to empowerment and independence for persons with disabilities.

Objectives

  • Use the power of inclusive sports as a transformational tool in IDP camps and schools to break down the barriers preventing persons with disabilities from accessing humanitarian response services and education.
  • Promote inclusion in mainstream sports activities in three IDP camps and 90 schools.
  • Create an environment that promotes acceptance of disability.

Project activities

Creation of five inclusive football and basketball teams:

  • Community mobilisation with the support of community-based rehabilitation workers and disability inclusion facilitators
  • Procurement of sports equipment for football, basketball and indoor games, including first aid kits and dignity kits for girls with disabilities
  • Recruitment and orientation of coaches who will provide weekly coaching

Tournaments:

  • Tournaments in Juba every quarter for teams from three IDP camps
  • Friendly matches every month

Teacher training:

  • Training workshop for teachers/coaches in disability inclusion, inclusive sports, inclusive education and children’s rights
  • Refresher training for teachers and coaches
  • Follow-up on the impact of the training

Raising awareness:

  • Awareness raising campaign on disability rights/inclusion and peaceful coexistence including camp management committees
  • Celebration of World Refugee Day and International Day of Persons with Disabilities and production of information, education and communication materials

Disability mainstreaming:

  • Disability mainstreaming training for humanitarian and development organisations
  • Follow-ups and on-the-job coaching for humanitarian staff trained in disability inclusion
  • Continuous engagement with ministries, NGOs, companies and other stakeholders

Expected results

  • 5,000 children with disabilities will have access to existing services, including sports
  • 864 children with disabilities (250 girls and 614 boys) will participate in tournaments
  • 32 children from the inclusive sports team will be supported to become professional players
  • Five inclusive sports for peace teams will be created and trained and they will take part in friendly matches, tournaments and awareness raising campaigns
  • 90 teachers from 90 schools will be trained in inclusive sports lessons in a three-day training course
  • More than 18,000 people will be more aware of disability inclusion
  • There will be mass awareness campaigns in all three IDP camps and 90 schools
  • 18 humanitarian agencies in the IDP camps will become disability inclusive, through a five-day capacity-building training course

Partner